Organizing interactive exhibits, presentations & social hours
that make life interesting

Events are free unless noted otherwise. Check out our Facebook page to engage with others who will be attending or to add to the conversation.

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“But I Just Had to Brace Up and Do My Best: Nurses in World War I” — UW Libraries Lecture Series 2:00 PM
“But I Just Had to Brace Up and Do My Best: Nurses in World War I” — UW Libraries Lecture Series @ Coe Library, Room 506
Sep 11 @ 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM
"But I Just Had to Brace Up and Do My Best: Nurses in World War I" -- UW Libraries Lecture Series @ Coe Library, Room 506 | Laramie | Wyoming | United States
Dr. Mary Burman will use diaries, letters, and other sources to illustrate the experiences of nurses during World War I, focusing on American nurses who served overseas.  The impact of military service in WWI on
“Vietnam: A Wyoming Reflection” 6:30 PM
“Vietnam: A Wyoming Reflection” @ Wyoming National Guard Joint Forces Readiness Center
Sep 11 @ 6:30 PM – 8:30 PM
"Vietnam: A Wyoming Reflection" @ Wyoming National Guard Joint Forces Readiness Center | Cheyenne | Wyoming | United States
Host Craig Blumenshine will moderate a round-table discussion, as a feature recording to air on September 15 on WYPBS,  on issues from various perspectives with a panel of Wyoming Vietnam veterans. Governor Matt Mead will
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Saturday University Pinedale 8:30 AM
Saturday University Pinedale @ Sublette County Library, Lovatt Room
Sep 16 @ 8:30 AM – 12:30 PM
Saturday University Pinedale @ Sublette County Library, Lovatt Room | Pinedale | Wyoming | United States
Go back to school for a day, minus the tests, stress and homework. Each Saturday U term features lectures from three outstanding University of Wyoming professors. Following the lectures, all three professors will participate in
Understanding the Muslim Faith 9:30 AM
Understanding the Muslim Faith @ Wyoming Medical Center Conference Room
Sep 16 @ 9:30 AM – 3:00 PM
A Discussion hosted by the Wyoming Association of Churches and Wyoming Humanities. This free symposium will feature: Dr.Mohamed Salih Dr. Mohamed Salih is native of Sudan who migrated to the U.S. in the early seventies.
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“Warriors in Khaki: Indian Doughboys in the Great War” — UW Libraries Lecture Series 7:30 PM
“Warriors in Khaki: Indian Doughboys in the Great War” — UW Libraries Lecture Series @ Alice Hardie Stevens Center
Sep 19 @ 7:30 PM – 9:00 PM
"Warriors in Khaki: Indian Doughboys in the Great War" -- UW Libraries Lecture Series @ Alice Hardie Stevens Center | Laramie | Wyoming | United States
More than twelve thousand American Indians served int he U.S. Armed Forces in the Great War.  Interestingly, at the beginning of the war, many of these Indians were not U.S. citizens and did not enjoy
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Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time 7:00 PM
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Casper College, Wheeler Concert Hall
Sep 20 @ 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Casper College, Wheeler Concert Hall
Tibet and China have had a complex relationship for 1500 years. Wars have been fought, treaties signed, then ignored in the next conquest. But there was always trade. In this presentation, National Geographic writer Mark
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Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time 6:00 PM
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Eastern Wyoming College - Douglas campus
Sep 21 @ 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Eastern Wyoming College - Douglas campus
Tibet and China have had a complex relationship for 1500 years. Wars have been fought, treaties signed, then ignored in the next conquest. But there was always trade. In this presentation, National Geographic writer Mark
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Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time 7:00 PM
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Eastern Wyoming College, Fine Arts Auditorium
Sep 22 @ 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Eastern Wyoming College, Fine Arts Auditorium
Tibet and China have had a complex relationship for 1500 years. Wars have been fought, treaties signed, then ignored in the next conquest. But there was always trade. In this presentation, National Geographic writer Mark
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Saturday University Sheridan 8:30 AM
Saturday University Sheridan @ Sheridan College, Whitney Presentation Hall
Sep 23 @ 8:30 AM – 12:30 PM
Saturday University Sheridan @ Sheridan College, Whitney Presentation Hall | Sheridan | Wyoming | United States
Go back to school for a day, minus the tests, stress and homework. Each Saturday U term features lectures from three outstanding University of Wyoming professors. Following the lectures, all three professors will participate in
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Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time 6:00 PM
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Laramie County Library, Cottenwood Room
Sep 27 @ 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Laramie County Library, Cottenwood Room
Tibet and China have had a complex relationship for 1500 years. Wars have been fought, treaties signed, then ignored in the next conquest. But there was always trade. In this presentation, National Geographic writer Mark
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“Ferret Town” documentary screening 7:00 PM
“Ferret Town” documentary screening @ Buffalo Bill Center of West
Sep 30 @ 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM
"Ferret Town" documentary screening @ Buffalo Bill Center of West | Cody | Wyoming | United States
Come see “Ferret Town,” with guest speakers and a live “Ambassador” black-footed ferret from the National Black-Footed Ferret Conservation Center. In 1979 the black footed ferret was thought to be extinct – gone forever from the great
Sep
20
Wed
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Casper College, Wheeler Concert Hall
Sep 20 @ 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Casper College, Wheeler Concert Hall

Tibet and China have had a complex relationship for 1500 years. Wars have been fought, treaties signed, then ignored in the next conquest. But there was always trade. In this presentation, National Geographic writer Mark Jenkins takes us on a journey down the forgotten Tea Horse Road. For almost 1000 years there was a stone-paved road that connected Ya’an, the tea-growing capital of Sichuan province, with Lhasa, the 12,000-foot high capital of Tibet. Tea was essential to daily life in Tibet, and China’s feudal kingdoms needed war horses. For centuries China and Tibet were on equal footing, but the ascendancy of China in the second half of the 20th century has devastated Tibet and Tibetan culture. With National Geographic images, Jenkins reveals the modern lives of the Tibetans, and the Chinese, and the geopolitics that have always connected them.

A critically acclaimed author and internationally recognized journalist, Mark Jenkins covers geopolitics, the environment and adventure for National Geographic. Jenkins’ writing has won numerous awards, including the Overseas Press Club Ross Award for “The Healing Fields” story about landmines in Cambodia and a National Magazine Award for photojournalism with colleague Brint Stirton, for “Who Murdered The Mountain Gorillas” – both of which were the focus of previous World to Wyoming tours around Wyoming. Jenkins is the author of four books and his work has appeared in dozens of national and international magazines.  He has his BA in Philosophy and MS in Geography from the University of Wyoming.

Sponsored by the UW Office of Academic Affairs, Global and Area Studies, Outreach School, the Rocky Mountain Power Foundation, thinkWY | Wyoming Humanities, the Homer and Mildred Scott Foundation, Buffalo Bill Center for the West, National Wildlife Museum and our Wyoming college partners who help us bring the World to Wyoming tour around Wyoming.

Sep
21
Thu
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Eastern Wyoming College - Douglas campus
Sep 21 @ 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Eastern Wyoming College - Douglas campus

Tibet and China have had a complex relationship for 1500 years. Wars have been fought, treaties signed, then ignored in the next conquest. But there was always trade. In this presentation, National Geographic writer Mark Jenkins takes us on a journey down the forgotten Tea Horse Road. For almost 1000 years there was a stone-paved road that connected Ya’an, the tea-growing capital of Sichuan province, with Lhasa, the 12,000-foot high capital of Tibet. Tea was essential to daily life in Tibet, and China’s feudal kingdoms needed war horses. For centuries China and Tibet were on equal footing, but the ascendancy of China in the second half of the 20th century has devastated Tibet and Tibetan culture. With National Geographic images, Jenkins reveals the modern lives of the Tibetans, and the Chinese, and the geopolitics that have always connected them.

A critically acclaimed author and internationally recognized journalist, Mark Jenkins covers geopolitics, the environment and adventure for National Geographic. Jenkins’ writing has won numerous awards, including the Overseas Press Club Ross Award for “The Healing Fields” story about landmines in Cambodia and a National Magazine Award for photojournalism with colleague Brint Stirton, for “Who Murdered The Mountain Gorillas” – both of which were the focus of previous World to Wyoming tours around Wyoming. Jenkins is the author of four books and his work has appeared in dozens of national and international magazines.  He has his BA in Philosophy and MS in Geography from the University of Wyoming.

Sponsored by the UW Office of Academic Affairs, Global and Area Studies, Outreach School, the Rocky Mountain Power Foundation, thinkWY | Wyoming Humanities, the Homer and Mildred Scott Foundation, Buffalo Bill Center for the West, National Wildlife Museum and our Wyoming college partners who help us bring the World to Wyoming tour around Wyoming.

Sep
22
Fri
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Eastern Wyoming College, Fine Arts Auditorium
Sep 22 @ 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Eastern Wyoming College, Fine Arts Auditorium

Tibet and China have had a complex relationship for 1500 years. Wars have been fought, treaties signed, then ignored in the next conquest. But there was always trade. In this presentation, National Geographic writer Mark Jenkins takes us on a journey down the forgotten Tea Horse Road. For almost 1000 years there was a stone-paved road that connected Ya’an, the tea-growing capital of Sichuan province, with Lhasa, the 12,000-foot high capital of Tibet. Tea was essential to daily life in Tibet, and China’s feudal kingdoms needed war horses. For centuries China and Tibet were on equal footing, but the ascendancy of China in the second half of the 20th century has devastated Tibet and Tibetan culture. With National Geographic images, Jenkins reveals the modern lives of the Tibetans, and the Chinese, and the geopolitics that have always connected them.

A critically acclaimed author and internationally recognized journalist, Mark Jenkins covers geopolitics, the environment and adventure for National Geographic. Jenkins’ writing has won numerous awards, including the Overseas Press Club Ross Award for “The Healing Fields” story about landmines in Cambodia and a National Magazine Award for photojournalism with colleague Brint Stirton, for “Who Murdered The Mountain Gorillas” – both of which were the focus of previous World to Wyoming tours around Wyoming. Jenkins is the author of four books and his work has appeared in dozens of national and international magazines.  He has his BA in Philosophy and MS in Geography from the University of Wyoming.

Sponsored by the UW Office of Academic Affairs, Global and Area Studies, Outreach School, the Rocky Mountain Power Foundation, thinkWY | Wyoming Humanities, the Homer and Mildred Scott Foundation, Buffalo Bill Center for the West, National Wildlife Museum and our Wyoming college partners who help us bring the World to Wyoming tour around Wyoming.

Sep
23
Sat
Saturday University Sheridan @ Sheridan College, Whitney Presentation Hall
Sep 23 @ 8:30 AM – 12:30 PM
Saturday University Sheridan @ Sheridan College, Whitney Presentation Hall | Sheridan | Wyoming | United States

Go back to school for a day, minus the tests, stress and homework.

Each Saturday U term features lectures from three outstanding University of Wyoming professors. Following the lectures, all three professors will participate in a final round-table discussion. Participants may attend one, two, three, or all four sessions. No registration is required, and there is no charge.

8:30 am: Coffee and donuts

9:00 am: “Marketing the Wonderful Wizard of Oz: L. Frank Baum and Ozmania,”  Susan Aronstein, Professor of English, University of Wyoming

Sold-out performances! Standing room only! Box office records broken! Touring companies bringing shows to eager fans across the country. No, we’re not describing Wicked, the hit musical still on Broadway after 14 years, nor Judy Garland’s filmed trip down the yellow brick film road in technicolor ruby slippers. No, Ozmania first swept the country in 1903. The show was The Wizard of Oz—adapted from L. Frank Baum’s bestselling children’s book, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. This talk explores the original Oz craze and how the marketing wizard L. Frank Baum put Oz into America’s imagination, building his book into sequels, spin-offs, and comics, as well as a traveling extravaganza and silent films.

10:15 am: “Jesus Reading Scripture at Nazareth: The Archaeology of Worship in First-Century Synagogues,” Paul Flesher, Professor of Religious Studies, University of Wyoming

In the study of ancient Judaism, our portrayal of worship largely derives from textual evidence, from the Bible to the Dead Sea scrolls and rabbinic literature, and everything in between. Missing from the picture has been the archaeology of synagogues where such worship took place. This talk takes what we know about synagogue worship in the first century CE and portrays it in the archaeological remains of actual first-century synagogues. This move highlights the dynamics of worship and social interaction different synagogue plans encourage, and casts different interpretative perspectives on the Gospel of Luke’s story of Jesus reading Scripture in the Nazareth synagogue.

11:30 am: “Art and Religion in the Philosophy of Paul Weiss,”  Dr. Paul Young, President, Sheridan College

Both Art and Religion make claims to reach something which is beyond the world of ordinary experience or that can be reduced to scientific, cultural, political or other explanations.  How is this possible? This lecture will explore the thought of 20th century philosopher Paul Weiss on this problem and Weiss’ solution which combines the robustness of classical metaphysics with a uniquely American pragmatic approach.

Sep
27
Wed
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Laramie County Library, Cottenwood Room
Sep 27 @ 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Laramie County Library, Cottenwood Room

Tibet and China have had a complex relationship for 1500 years. Wars have been fought, treaties signed, then ignored in the next conquest. But there was always trade. In this presentation, National Geographic writer Mark Jenkins takes us on a journey down the forgotten Tea Horse Road. For almost 1000 years there was a stone-paved road that connected Ya’an, the tea-growing capital of Sichuan province, with Lhasa, the 12,000-foot high capital of Tibet. Tea was essential to daily life in Tibet, and China’s feudal kingdoms needed war horses. For centuries China and Tibet were on equal footing, but the ascendancy of China in the second half of the 20th century has devastated Tibet and Tibetan culture. With National Geographic images, Jenkins reveals the modern lives of the Tibetans, and the Chinese, and the geopolitics that have always connected them.

A critically acclaimed author and internationally recognized journalist, Mark Jenkins covers geopolitics, the environment and adventure for National Geographic. Jenkins’ writing has won numerous awards, including the Overseas Press Club Ross Award for “The Healing Fields” story about landmines in Cambodia and a National Magazine Award for photojournalism with colleague Brint Stirton, for “Who Murdered The Mountain Gorillas” – both of which were the focus of previous World to Wyoming tours around Wyoming. Jenkins is the author of four books and his work has appeared in dozens of national and international magazines.  He has his BA in Philosophy and MS in Geography from the University of Wyoming.

Sponsored by the UW Office of Academic Affairs, Global and Area Studies, Outreach School, the Rocky Mountain Power Foundation, thinkWY | Wyoming Humanities, the Homer and Mildred Scott Foundation, Buffalo Bill Center for the West, National Wildlife Museum and our Wyoming college partners who help us bring the World to Wyoming tour around Wyoming.

Sep
30
Sat
“Ferret Town” documentary screening @ Buffalo Bill Center of West
Sep 30 @ 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM
"Ferret Town" documentary screening @ Buffalo Bill Center of West | Cody | Wyoming | United States

Come see “Ferret Town,” with guest speakers and a live “Ambassador” black-footed ferret from the National Black-Footed Ferret Conservation Center.

In 1979 the black footed ferret was thought to be extinct – gone forever from the great plains. Then in 1981, a small population was discovered near the remote town of Meeteetse, Wyoming, inciting a race to recover the species from the remaining 18 individuals. In this documentary, captive breeding programs, disease outbreaks, habitat protection, political hurdles and diverse cultural beliefs lead up to the long awaited return of black footed ferrets to a town that was reshaped by their discovery. “Ferret Town” presents one of the best conservation stories in the United States, posing the question- how far will we go to save one species?

This film is produced by The Content Lab LLC, an independent production company based in Wyoming, with support from The Meeteetse Museum Foundation, thinkWY | Wyoming Humanities, and the The Wyoming Cultural Trust Fund, and with the cooperation of the US Fish and Wildlife Service, the Wyoming Game and Fish Department, and private landowners.

Oct
1
Sun
“Ferret Town” documentary screening @ Center for the Arts
Oct 1 @ 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM
"Ferret Town" documentary screening @ Center for the Arts | Jackson | Wyoming | United States

Come see “Ferret Town” at the Jackson Hole WILD Film Fest, including guest speakers and a live “Ambassador” black-footed ferret from the National Black-Footed Ferret Conservation Center.

In 1979 the black footed ferret was thought to be extinct – gone forever from the great plains. Then in 1981, a small population was discovered near the remote town of Meeteetse, Wyoming, inciting a race to recover the species from the remaining 18 individuals. In this documentary, captive breeding programs, disease outbreaks, habitat protection, political hurdles and diverse cultural beliefs lead up to the long awaited return of black footed ferrets to a town that was reshaped by their discovery. “Ferret Town” presents one of the best conservation stories in the United States, posing the question- how far will we go to save one species?

This film is produced by The Content Lab LLC, an independent production company based in Wyoming, with support from The Meeteetse Museum Foundation, thinkWY | Wyoming Humanities, and the The Wyoming Cultural Trust Fund, and with the cooperation of the US Fish and Wildlife Service, the Wyoming Game and Fish Department, and private landowners.

Oct
2
Mon
“Ferret Town” documentary screening @ Berry Biodiversity Conservation Center
Oct 2 @ 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM
"Ferret Town" documentary screening @ Berry Biodiversity Conservation Center | Laramie | Wyoming | United States

Come see “Ferret Town,” with a live “Ambassador” black-footed ferret from the National Black-Footed Ferret Conservation Center.

In 1979 the black footed ferret was thought to be extinct – gone forever from the great plains. Then in 1981, a small population was discovered near the remote town of Meeteetse, Wyoming, inciting a race to recover the species from the remaining 18 individuals. In this documentary, captive breeding programs, disease outbreaks, habitat protection, political hurdles and diverse cultural beliefs lead up to the long awaited return of black footed ferrets to a town that was reshaped by their discovery. “Ferret Town” presents one of the best conservation stories in the United States, posing the question- how far will we go to save one species?

This film is produced by The Content Lab LLC, an independent production company based in Wyoming, with support from The Meeteetse Museum Foundation, thinkWY | Wyoming Humanities, and the The Wyoming Cultural Trust Fund, and with the cooperation of the US Fish and Wildlife Service, the Wyoming Game and Fish Department, and private landowners.

“Home Front in Wyoming” — UW Libraries Lecture Series @ Alice Hardie Stevens Center
Oct 2 @ 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM
"Home Front in Wyoming" -- UW Libraries Lecture Series @ Alice Hardie Stevens Center | Laramie | Wyoming | United States

Tom Rea will discuss civilian life in Wyoming during the years immediately before, during, and after the nation’s engagement in the war in 1917 and 1918.  He will share anecdotes about the Red Cross fundraisers, the war bond drives, the anti-German sentiment and activities of the One Hundred Percent American Society, the murder trial of John Leibig, the enforcement of the Sedition Act, victory gardens, and more that occurred in Wyoming.

Tom Rea is the Editor of WyoHistory.org, a project of the Wyoming State Historical Society.  This program is sponsored in part bye the Laramie Plains Museum.

Oct
4
Wed
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Western Wyoming College, Room 1302
Oct 4 @ 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Western Wyoming College, Room 1302

Tibet and China have had a complex relationship for 1500 years. Wars have been fought, treaties signed, then ignored in the next conquest. But there was always trade. In this presentation, National Geographic writer Mark Jenkins takes us on a journey down the forgotten Tea Horse Road. For almost 1000 years there was a stone-paved road that connected Ya’an, the tea-growing capital of Sichuan province, with Lhasa, the 12,000-foot high capital of Tibet. Tea was essential to daily life in Tibet, and China’s feudal kingdoms needed war horses. For centuries China and Tibet were on equal footing, but the ascendancy of China in the second half of the 20th century has devastated Tibet and Tibetan culture. With National Geographic images, Jenkins reveals the modern lives of the Tibetans, and the Chinese, and the geopolitics that have always connected them.

A critically acclaimed author and internationally recognized journalist, Mark Jenkins covers geopolitics, the environment and adventure for National Geographic. Jenkins’ writing has won numerous awards, including the Overseas Press Club Ross Award for “The Healing Fields” story about landmines in Cambodia and a National Magazine Award for photojournalism with colleague Brint Stirton, for “Who Murdered The Mountain Gorillas” – both of which were the focus of previous World to Wyoming tours around Wyoming. Jenkins is the author of four books and his work has appeared in dozens of national and international magazines.  He has his BA in Philosophy and MS in Geography from the University of Wyoming.

Sponsored by the UW Office of Academic Affairs, Global and Area Studies, Outreach School, the Rocky Mountain Power Foundation, thinkWY | Wyoming Humanities, the Homer and Mildred Scott Foundation, Buffalo Bill Center for the West, National Wildlife Museum and our Wyoming college partners who help us bring the World to Wyoming tour around Wyoming.

We look to engage all aspects of communities through a diverse and dynamic offering of programs.

Click on any of the programs below to learn more!

thinkWY Gatherings

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