Organizing interactive exhibits, presentations & social hours
that make life interesting

Events are free unless noted otherwise. Check out our Facebook page to engage with others who will be attending or to add to the conversation.

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
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Reading Wyoming Jackson: “In the Skin of the Lion” 7:00 PM
Reading Wyoming Jackson: “In the Skin of the Lion” @ Jackson Whole Grocer Community Room
Feb 8 @ 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Reading Wyoming Jackson: "In the Skin of the Lion" @ Jackson Whole Grocer Community Room
Come discuss books that examine the topic of immigration and displacement, moderated by local scholar Stephen Lottridge. February’s discussion is focused on Michael Ondaatje’s In the Skin of the Lion “Bristling with intelligence and shimmering
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Prevention of interpersonal violence and promoting gender justice 3:00 PM
Prevention of interpersonal violence and promoting gender justice @ Hansen Hall, St. John's Episcopal Church
Feb 11 @ 3:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Prevention of interpersonal violence and promoting gender justice by Sally MacNichol, keynote speaker and expert from Faith Trust Institute Sally N. MacNichol Ph.D, is Co-Executive Director of CONNECT, a New York City nonprofit organization dedicated
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Saturday U Gillette 6:00 PM
Saturday U Gillette @ Campbell County Public Library
Feb 15 @ 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Saturday U Gillette @ Campbell County Public Library
Go back to school for a day, minus the tests, stress and homework. Each Saturday U term features lectures from three outstanding University of Wyoming professors. Following the lectures, all three professors will participate in
Read, Rant, Relate: “Rocket Man” 7:00 PM
Read, Rant, Relate: “Rocket Man” @ Relative Theatrics Studio, Room 278 in the Laramie Plains Civic Center
Feb 15 @ 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Read, Rant, Relate: "Rocket Man" @ Relative Theatrics Studio, Room 278 in the Laramie Plains Civic Center
Experience four new pieces of contemporary dramatic literature with Relative Theatrics. Participants will engage directly with modern plays by listening to actor-led readings of the texts, then joining discussions breaking down the thematic elements of
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Reading Wyoming Baggs: “The Witch Doctor’s Wife” 2:00 PM
Reading Wyoming Baggs: “The Witch Doctor’s Wife” @ Baggs Library, Cowboy Meeting Room
Feb 16 @ 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Reading Wyoming Baggs: "The Witch Doctor's Wife" @ Baggs Library, Cowboy Meeting Room
Come discuss books that help us understand the field of medicine, not only the “what” and “how,” but also exploring the “why” of human experiences. February’s discussion is focused on Tamar Myers’ The Witch Doctor’s
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Saturday U Sheridan 9:00 AM
Saturday U Sheridan @ Whitney Academic Center, Sheridan College
Feb 17 @ 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM
Saturday U Sheridan @ Whitney Academic Center, Sheridan College
Go back to school for a day, minus the tests, stress and homework. Each Saturday U term features lectures from three outstanding University of Wyoming professors. Following the lectures, all three professors will participate in
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“The Trial of Tom Horn” 7:00 PM
“The Trial of Tom Horn” @ Western Wyoming College
Feb 22 @ 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
"The Trial of Tom Horn" @ Western Wyoming College
John W. Davis, a trial lawyer from Worland, Wyoming will be showcasing his new book The Trial of Tom Horn, published with the University of Oklahoma Press in 2016. Mr. Davis has had a long
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“Camels, Climbing and St. Catherine: An Expedition to Egypt with National Geographic’s Mark Jenkins” (Laramie) 7:00 PM
“Camels, Climbing and St. Catherine: An Expedition to Egypt with National Geographic’s Mark Jenkins” (Laramie) @ UW Arts & Sciences Auditorium
Feb 27 @ 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
"Camels, Climbing and St. Catherine: An Expedition to Egypt with National Geographic's Mark Jenkins" (Laramie) @ UW Arts & Sciences Auditorium
Hidden in the heart of the desert mountains of the Sinai peninsula are enormous walls and domes of red granite. It’s an unknown little Yosemite on the edge of the Middle East. In November, National
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27
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“Camels, Climbing and St. Catherine: An Expedition to Egypt with National Geographic’s Mark Jenkins” (Laramie) @ UW Arts & Sciences Auditorium
Feb 27 @ 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
"Camels, Climbing and St. Catherine: An Expedition to Egypt with National Geographic's Mark Jenkins" (Laramie) @ UW Arts & Sciences Auditorium

Hidden in the heart of the desert mountains of the Sinai peninsula are enormous walls and domes of red granite. It’s an unknown little Yosemite on the edge of the Middle East. In November, National Geographic writer and Center for Global Studies Senior Fellow Mark Jenkins Mark Jenkins led a 4-man team of Wyoming climbers to South Sinai in search of unclimbed rock. The team lived with the Bedouins, traveled by camel caravan and put up new routes on 1000-foot walls of shining granite.

South Sinai is a pivotal region in the three Abrahamic religions: Christianity, Judaism and Islam. It was on Mount Sinai that Moses is said to have received the Ten Commandments. The team hiked the 3000 “Steps of Repentance” to the summit of Mt. Sinai along with dozens of pilgrims, Muslims, Christians, and Jews. At the base of Mt. Sinai lies Saint Catherine’s Monastery, built in 565 A.D. upon the site where Moses saw the burning bush. Named after Catherine of Alexandria who was sentenced to death on the spiked wheel, St. Catherine’s is the oldest continuously operating monastery in the word. Christians and Muslims have lived here in harmony for over a millennium–there’s even a mosque inside the monastery.

“Camels, Climbing and St. Catherine: A Expedition to Egypt,” is a presentation about an epic expedition to climb big walls in a remote land, about Christian monks and Bedouin nomads, about a place where tolerance is more powerful than terrorism.

Mar
1
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Saturday U Pinedale @ Sublette County Library, Lovatt Room
Mar 1 @ 5:30 PM – 8:00 PM
Saturday U Pinedale @ Sublette County Library, Lovatt Room

Go back to school for a day, minus the tests, stress and homework.

Each Saturday U term features lectures from three outstanding University of Wyoming professors. Following the lectures, all three professors will participate in a final round-table discussion. Participants may attend one, two, three, or all four sessions. No registration is required, and there is no charge.

5:30 pm: Doors open; light dinner and snacks.

6:00 pm: “Who Gets to Drink?,” Dr. Kristi Hansen, Associate Professor of Agricultural and Applied Economics, University of Wyoming

Water is a limited resource in most of the western United States, yet growing populations and environmental demands increase pressure on existing supplies. Who should be allowed to use it when supplies become more scarce? To answer this, Hansen will describe how economists think about water allocation among competing users and different uses, drawing lessons for the drought-stricken Upper Colorado Basin.

6:50 pm: “Income Inequality: Its Effects on the USA’s Economic and Political Future,Dr. Rob Godby, Associate Professor of Economics; Director, Center for Energy Economics & Public Policy, University of Wyoming

We hear almost daily about our country’s political divide, but the United States faces an even more disruptive division, that of increasing income inequality. As the economic divide has grown over the past two decades, it has enhanced the perception that America is facing a financial crisis as well as a political one. Godby will explain what income inequality is and examine the dynamics that have led to the current situation, as well as providing some hope for the future.

7:40 pm: “Wyoming’s First Humans at an Ice Age Mammoth Kill Site,Dr. Todd Surovell, Professor of Archaeology; Chair, Department of Anthropology, University of Wyoming

The first people to live in Wyoming arrived more than 13,000 years ago after crossing a land bridge from Asia to North America and moving southward through the northern glaciers. Upon arrival, these people encountered many types of large mammals which have since disappeared from New World ecosystems. At the La Prele Mammoth site in Converse County, University of Wyoming archaeologists have discovered evidence of human predation of a Columbian mammoth as well as a campsite that can shed light on the social organization of Wyoming’s first residents.

Saturday University in Pinedale is sponsored by the University of Wyoming, Wyoming Humanities, Sublette BOCES and Sublette County Libraries.

Reading Wyoming Jackson: “The Namesake” @ Jackson Whole Grocer Community Room
Mar 1 @ 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Reading Wyoming Jackson: "The Namesake" @ Jackson Whole Grocer Community Room

Come discuss books that examine the topic of immigration and displacement, moderated by local scholar Stephen Lottridge.

March’s discussion is focused on Jhumpa Lahiri’s The Namesake.  “Moving between events in Calcutta, Boston, and New York City, the novel examines the nuances involved with being caught between two conflicting cultures with highly distinct religious, social, and ideological differences.”

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Saturday U Jackson @ National Museum of Wildlife Art Auditorium
Mar 3 @ 8:30 AM – 12:30 PM
Saturday U Jackson @ National Museum of Wildlife Art Auditorium

Go back to school for a day, minus the tests, stress and homework.

Each Saturday U term features lectures from three outstanding University of Wyoming professors. Following the lectures, all three professors will participate in a final round-table discussion. Participants may attend one, two, three, or all four sessions. No registration is required, and there is no charge.

8:30 am: Doors open; coffee and donuts

9:00 am: “Stories from the Mongolian Taiga,” Dr. Todd Surovell, Professor of Archaeology; Chair, Department of Anthropology, University of Wyoming

Since 2012, Surovell has been doing research with reindeer herders in Khövsgöl Province of northern Mongolia, studying their traditional ways with an eye toward developing comparative interpretations of the archaeological record of similar peoples. After spending a total of seven months, in all four seasons, he has learned much about the year-round rhythm of reindeer herder life. This presentation aims to bring the audience face-to-face with some of the more astounding aspects of the herders’ life on the taiga through experiences, stories and pictures—illustrating the goals, trepidations, and pleasure of their lives.

10:15 am: “Who Gets to Drink?,Dr. Kristi Hansen, Associate Professor of Agricultural and Applied Economics, University of Wyoming

Water is a limited resource in most of the western United States, yet growing populations and environmental demands increase pressure on existing supplies. Who should be allowed to use it when supplies become more scarce? To answer this, Hansen will describe how economists think about water allocation among competing users and different uses, drawing lessons for the drought-stricken Upper Colorado Basin.

11:30 am: “Income Inequality: Its Effects on the USA’s Economic and Political Future, Dr. Rob Godby, Associate Professor of Economics; Director, Center for Energy Economics & Public Policy, University of Wyoming

We hear almost daily about our country’s political divide, but the United States faces an even more disruptive division, that of increasing income inequality. As the economic divide has grown over the past two decades, it has enhanced the perception that America is facing a financial crisis as well as a political one. Godby will explain what income inequality is and examine the dynamics that have led to the current situation, as well as providing some hope for the future.

Presentations followed by a roundtable discussion with speakers over FREE lunch.

Saturday University in Jackson is sponsored by the University of Wyoming, Wyoming Humanities, National Museum of Wildlife Art and Central Wyoming College-Jackson.

Mar
6
Tue
“Camels, Climbing and St. Catherine: An Expedition to Egypt with National Geographic’s Mark Jenkins” (Sheridan) @ Whitney Center for the Arts Concert Hall, Sheridan College
Mar 6 @ 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
"Camels, Climbing and St. Catherine: An Expedition to Egypt with National Geographic's Mark Jenkins" (Sheridan) @ Whitney Center for the Arts Concert Hall, Sheridan College

Hidden in the heart of the desert mountains of the Sinai peninsula are enormous walls and domes of red granite. It’s an unknown little Yosemite on the edge of the Middle East. In November, National Geographic writer and Center for Global Studies Senior Fellow Mark Jenkins Mark Jenkins led a 4-man team of Wyoming climbers to South Sinai in search of unclimbed rock. The team lived with the Bedouins, traveled by camel caravan and put up new routes on 1000-foot walls of shining granite.

South Sinai is a pivotal region in the three Abrahamic religions: Christianity, Judaism and Islam. It was on Mount Sinai that Moses is said to have received the Ten Commandments. The team hiked the 3000 “Steps of Repentance” to the summit of Mt. Sinai along with dozens of pilgrims, Muslims, Christians, and Jews. At the base of Mt. Sinai lies Saint Catherine’s Monastery, built in 565 A.D. upon the site where Moses saw the burning bush. Named after Catherine of Alexandria who was sentenced to death on the spiked wheel, St. Catherine’s is the oldest continuously operating monastery in the world. Christians and Muslims have lived here in harmony for over a millennium–there’s even a mosque inside the monastery.

“Camels, Climbing and St. Catherine: A Expedition to Egypt,” is a presentation about an epic expedition to climb big walls in a remote land, about Christian monks and Bedouin nomads, about a place where tolerance is more powerful than terrorism.

Mar
7
Wed
“Deep Mapping” Writing Workshop with Kali Fajardo-Anstine @ Center for the Arts, Conference Room
Mar 7 @ 6:00 PM – 8:30 PM
"Deep Mapping" Writing Workshop with Kali Fajardo-Anstine @ Center for the Arts, Conference Room

Join award-winning writer and teacher Kali Fajardo-Anstine for a writing workshop.  Participants will read a short story by Latina author Sandra Cisneros (copies provided in advance) and then discuss the themes and their impacts on communities and individuals.  The discussion will move into generative writing, based loosely on William Least Heat Moon’s Blue Highway as a model for “deep mapping” of a story, whether fictional or not.  This workshop is geared toward high school age students and adults writing in English.

“Camels, Climbing and St. Catherine: An Expedition to Egypt with National Geographic’s Mark Jenkins” (Gillette) @ Gillette College Presentation Hall
Mar 7 @ 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
"Camels, Climbing and St. Catherine: An Expedition to Egypt with National Geographic's Mark Jenkins" (Gillette) @ Gillette College Presentation Hall

Hidden in the heart of the desert mountains of the Sinai peninsula are enormous walls and domes of red granite. It’s an unknown little Yosemite on the edge of the Middle East. In November, National Geographic writer and Center for Global Studies Senior Fellow Mark Jenkins Mark Jenkins led a 4-man team of Wyoming climbers to South Sinai in search of unclimbed rock. The team lived with the Bedouins, traveled by camel caravan and put up new routes on 1000-foot walls of shining granite.

South Sinai is a pivotal region in the three Abrahamic religions: Christianity, Judaism and Islam. It was on Mount Sinai that Moses is said to have received the Ten Commandments. The team hiked the 3000 “Steps of Repentance” to the summit of Mt. Sinai along with dozens of pilgrims, Muslims, Christians, and Jews. At the base of Mt. Sinai lies Saint Catherine’s Monastery, built in 565 A.D. upon the site where Moses saw the burning bush. Named after Catherine of Alexandria who was sentenced to death on the spiked wheel, St. Catherine’s is the oldest continuously operating monastery in the world. Christians and Muslims have lived here in harmony for over a millennium–there’s even a mosque inside the monastery.

“Camels, Climbing and St. Catherine: A Expedition to Egypt,” is a presentation about an epic expedition to climb big walls in a remote land, about Christian monks and Bedouin nomads, about a place where tolerance is more powerful than terrorism.

Mar
8
Thu
Kali Fajardo-Anstine Reading @ Teton County Library, Ordway Auditorium
Mar 8 @ 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Kali Fajardo-Anstine Reading @ Teton County Library, Ordway Auditorium

Join award-winning writer and teacher Kali Fajardo-Anstine for a reading of her work, followed by a Q&A and free soup.

“Deep Mapping” Workshop for Parents and Children @ Teton Literacy Center, meeting area
Mar 8 @ 5:30 PM – 7:30 PM
"Deep Mapping" Workshop for Parents and Children @ Teton Literacy Center, meeting area

High school age students and their parents are invited to join award-winning writer and teacher Kali Fajardo-Anstine for a generative writing session.  Participants will be asked to examine a traditional Mexican folk tale.  The workshop will then open up for participants to share stories of their own culture.  The workshop is focused on the collection of these stories and a conversation between generations about the stories.  A translator will be available as needed.

Mar
10
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“Chekhov Unchecked” – Translation Workshop @ Black Box, Center for the Arts
Mar 10 @ 1:30 PM – 3:30 PM
"Chekhov Unchecked" - Translation Workshop @ Black Box, Center for the Arts

Join scholar Stephen Lottridge and Finnish theater artist Marjo-Riikka Makela for a workshop on the concepts of translation, what makes translations work, translating from the page to the stage, and translations through different time periods and geographies.  There will be demonstrations as well as an opportunity for hands-on work.

Part of Off Square Theater Company and the Russian Club of Jackson Hole’s “Chekhov Unchecked,” a weekend exploration of the dramatic writing of Chekhov and the role of translations in dramatic literature.

We look to engage all aspects of communities through a diverse and dynamic offering of programs.

Click on any of the programs below to learn more!

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Grants

Due to delays in the passage of the federal budget, Major grants for 2018 are not currently being accepted...

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