Organizing interactive exhibits, presentations & social hours
that make life interesting

Events are free unless noted otherwise. Check out our Facebook page to engage with others who will be attending or to add to the conversation.

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John Wesley Powell, Myrtle and Me: Journeys on the Colorado River with Jessica Flock 7:00 PM
John Wesley Powell, Myrtle and Me: Journeys on the Colorado River with Jessica Flock @ Pine Bluffs Branch Library
Feb 7 @ 7:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Jessica chronicles John Wesley Powell’s expeditions on the Green and Colorado Rivers. She intertwines her own adventures on the Colorado River with other contemporary experiences on the river using historic documents and photographs as well
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“Footnote” screening and discussion 7:00 PM
“Footnote” screening and discussion @ University of Wyoming, Classroom Building 133
Feb 8 @ 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
"Footnote" screening and discussion @ University of Wyoming, Classroom Building 133 | Laramie | Wyoming | United States
Professor Moshe Pinchuk introduces Joseph Cedar’s film Footnote, a feature film portraying a tense father-son relationship. The film is fictional, but depicts real tensions in the Israeli academic humanities—and the field portrayed is one in
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Challenges of Living in a Dual-Calendar Society 11:00 AM
Challenges of Living in a Dual-Calendar Society @ University of Wyoming, Classroom Building 103
Feb 9 @ 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Challenges of Living in a Dual-Calendar Society @ University of Wyoming, Classroom Building 103 | Laramie | Wyoming | United States
Professor Moshe Pinchuk discusses the Jewish, Islamic and Gregorian calendars, the conflicts between them, and the solutions applied in Israel, issues common to Israeli and Arab societies, and any dual-calendar cultures.    (in conjunction with RELI/HIST
David and Goliath’s Combat in the Light of Single-Combat Narratives in the Illiad and other Greek sources 4:10 PM
David and Goliath’s Combat in the Light of Single-Combat Narratives in the Illiad and other Greek sources @ University of Wyoming, Classroom Building 215
Feb 9 @ 4:10 PM – 5:30 PM
David and Goliath's Combat in the Light of Single-Combat Narratives in the Illiad and other Greek sources @ University of Wyoming, Classroom Building 215 | Laramie | Wyoming | United States
Professor Moshe Pinchuk’s talk compares the familiar Biblical story, a unique occurrence of single fighters representing opposing armies, with Greek accounts, in which champion combat is a far more frequent occurrence. Prof. Pinchuk directs the
Saturday U Gillette 5:30 PM
Saturday U Gillette @ Campbell County Public Library
Feb 9 @ 5:30 PM – 8:30 PM
Saturday U Gillette @ Campbell County Public Library | Gillette | Wyoming | United States
Go back to school for a day, minus the tests, stress and homework. Each Saturday U term features lectures from three outstanding University of Wyoming professors. Following the lectures, all three professors will participate in
Read, Rant, Relate: “Disgraced” 7:00 PM
Read, Rant, Relate: “Disgraced” @ Relative Theatrics Studio, Room 278 of the Laramie Plains Civic Center
Feb 9 @ 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Read, Rant, Relate: "Disgraced" @ Relative Theatrics Studio, Room 278 of the Laramie Plains Civic Center | Laramie | Wyoming | United States
Experience a new piece of contemporary dramatic literature every month with Relative Theatrics. Participants will engage directly with modern plays by listening to actor-led readings of the texts, then joining discussions breaking down the thematic
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Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time 7:00 PM
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ University of Wyoming, Arts & Sciences Auditorium
Feb 15 @ 7:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ University of Wyoming, Arts & Sciences Auditorium | Laramie | Wyoming | United States
Tibet and China have had a complex relationship for 1500 years. Wars have been fought, treaties signed, then ignored in the next conquest. But there was always trade. In this presentation, National Geographic writer Mark
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Cultural Gems; A Look at Unique US Libraries with Richard and Mary Maturi 6:30 PM
Cultural Gems; A Look at Unique US Libraries with Richard and Mary Maturi @ Hot Springs County Library
Feb 16 @ 6:30 PM – 8:00 PM
Cultural Gems; A Look at Unique US Libraries with Richard and Mary Maturi @ Hot Springs County Library  | Thermopolis | Wyoming | United States
Join Richard and Mary Maturi for Cultural Gems; A Look at Unique US Libraries, featuring  images and stories of libraries from coast to coast.  This presentation  illustrates the rich diversity of America’s libraries while exploring
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Saturday U Sheridan 8:30 AM
Saturday U Sheridan @ Sheridan College, Whitney Academic Center
Feb 25 @ 8:30 AM – 1:45 PM
Saturday U Sheridan @ Sheridan College, Whitney Academic Center | Sheridan | Wyoming | United States
Go back to school for a day, minus the tests, stress and homework. Each Saturday U term features lectures from three outstanding University of Wyoming professors. Following the lectures, all three professors will participate in
Insight Casper: Identity 7:00 PM
Insight Casper: Identity @ The Lyric Theatre
Feb 25 @ 7:00 PM – 9:15 PM
Insight Casper: Identity @ The Lyric Theatre | Casper | Wyoming | United States
We’re excited to announce the lineup for our next Insight event, Insight: Identity in Casper on February 25, 2017 at the Lyric Theatre downtown and and in conjunction with the Casper College Humanities Festival.  Insights
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Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time 7:00 PM
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Gillette College, Presentation Hall
Feb 28 @ 7:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Gillette College, Presentation Hall | Gillette | Wyoming | United States
Tibet and China have had a complex relationship for 1500 years. Wars have been fought, treaties signed, then ignored in the next conquest. But there was always trade. In this presentation, National Geographic writer Mark
Feb
28
Tue
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Gillette College, Presentation Hall
Feb 28 @ 7:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Gillette College, Presentation Hall | Gillette | Wyoming | United States

Tibet and China have had a complex relationship for 1500 years. Wars have been fought, treaties signed, then ignored in the next conquest. But there was always trade. In this presentation, National Geographic writer Mark Jenkins takes us on a journey down the forgotten Tea Horse Road. For almost 1000 years there was a stone-paved road that connected Ya’an, the tea-growing capital of Sichuan province, with Lhasa, the 12,000-foot high capital of Tibet. Tea was essential to daily life in Tibet, and China’s feudal kingdoms needed war horses. For centuries China and Tibet were on equal footing, but the ascendancy of China in the second half of the 20th century has devastated Tibet and Tibetan culture. With National Geographic images, Jenkins reveals the modern lives of the Tibetans, and the Chinese, and the geopolitics that have always connected them.

A critically acclaimed author and internationally recognized journalist, Mark Jenkins covers geopolitics, the environment and adventure for National Geographic. Jenkins’ writing has won numerous awards, including the Overseas Press Club Ross Award for “The Healing Fields” story about landmines in Cambodia and a National Magazine Award for photojournalism with colleague Brint Stirton, for “Who Murdered The Mountain Gorillas” – both of which were the focus of previous World to Wyoming tours around Wyoming. Jenkins is the author of four books and his work has appeared in dozens of national and international magazines.  He has his BA in Philosophy and MS in Geography from the University of Wyoming.

Sponsored by the UW Office of Academic Affairs, Global and Area Studies, Outreach School, the Rocky Mountain Power Foundation, thinkWY | Wyoming Humanities, the Homer and Mildred Scott Foundation, Buffalo Bill Center for the West, National Wildlife Museum and our Wyoming college partners who help us bring the World to Wyoming tour around Wyoming.

Mar
1
Wed
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Sheridan College, Whitney Concert Hall
Mar 1 @ 7:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Sheridan College, Whitney Concert Hall | Sheridan | Wyoming | United States

Tibet and China have had a complex relationship for 1500 years. Wars have been fought, treaties signed, then ignored in the next conquest. But there was always trade. In this presentation, National Geographic writer Mark Jenkins takes us on a journey down the forgotten Tea Horse Road. For almost 1000 years there was a stone-paved road that connected Ya’an, the tea-growing capital of Sichuan province, with Lhasa, the 12,000-foot high capital of Tibet. Tea was essential to daily life in Tibet, and China’s feudal kingdoms needed war horses. For centuries China and Tibet were on equal footing, but the ascendancy of China in the second half of the 20th century has devastated Tibet and Tibetan culture. With National Geographic images, Jenkins reveals the modern lives of the Tibetans, and the Chinese, and the geopolitics that have always connected them.

A critically acclaimed author and internationally recognized journalist, Mark Jenkins covers geopolitics, the environment and adventure for National Geographic. Jenkins’ writing has won numerous awards, including the Overseas Press Club Ross Award for “The Healing Fields” story about landmines in Cambodia and a National Magazine Award for photojournalism with colleague Brint Stirton, for “Who Murdered The Mountain Gorillas” – both of which were the focus of previous World to Wyoming tours around Wyoming. Jenkins is the author of four books and his work has appeared in dozens of national and international magazines.  He has his BA in Philosophy and MS in Geography from the University of Wyoming.

Sponsored by the UW Office of Academic Affairs, Global and Area Studies, Outreach School, the Rocky Mountain Power Foundation, thinkWY | Wyoming Humanities, the Homer and Mildred Scott Foundation, Buffalo Bill Center for the West, National Wildlife Museum and our Wyoming college partners who help us bring the World to Wyoming tour around Wyoming.

Mar
2
Thu
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Northwest College, Yellowstone Building
Mar 2 @ 6:30 PM – 7:30 PM
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Northwest College, Yellowstone Building | Powell | Wyoming | United States

Tibet and China have had a complex relationship for 1500 years. Wars have been fought, treaties signed, then ignored in the next conquest. But there was always trade. In this presentation, National Geographic writer Mark Jenkins takes us on a journey down the forgotten Tea Horse Road. For almost 1000 years there was a stone-paved road that connected Ya’an, the tea-growing capital of Sichuan province, with Lhasa, the 12,000-foot high capital of Tibet. Tea was essential to daily life in Tibet, and China’s feudal kingdoms needed war horses. For centuries China and Tibet were on equal footing, but the ascendancy of China in the second half of the 20th century has devastated Tibet and Tibetan culture. With National Geographic images, Jenkins reveals the modern lives of the Tibetans, and the Chinese, and the geopolitics that have always connected them.

A critically acclaimed author and internationally recognized journalist, Mark Jenkins covers geopolitics, the environment and adventure for National Geographic. Jenkins’ writing has won numerous awards, including the Overseas Press Club Ross Award for “The Healing Fields” story about landmines in Cambodia and a National Magazine Award for photojournalism with colleague Brint Stirton, for “Who Murdered The Mountain Gorillas” – both of which were the focus of previous World to Wyoming tours around Wyoming. Jenkins is the author of four books and his work has appeared in dozens of national and international magazines.  He has his BA in Philosophy and MS in Geography from the University of Wyoming.

Sponsored by the UW Office of Academic Affairs, Global and Area Studies, Outreach School, the Rocky Mountain Power Foundation, thinkWY | Wyoming Humanities, the Homer and Mildred Scott Foundation, Buffalo Bill Center for the West, National Wildlife Museum and our Wyoming college partners who help us bring the World to Wyoming tour around Wyoming.

Mar
3
Fri
World Languages Day: Planetarium Shows @ University of Wyoming campus
Mar 3 @ 6:30 PM – 9:00 PM
World Languages Day: Planetarium Shows @ University of Wyoming campus

World Languages Day (WLD) introduces Wyoming foreign language students to the University of Wyoming campus, exposes them to experts from around the world, and leaves a lasting impression of friendship and global understanding. Last year, UW hosted 240 students and instructors from across the state. Languages represented include Spanish, German, French, Chinese, Japanese, English as a Second Language and American Sign Language.

Mar
4
Sat
Saturday U Jackson @ National Museum of Wildlife Art
Mar 4 @ 8:30 AM – 12:30 PM
Saturday U Jackson @ National Museum of Wildlife Art | Jackson | Wyoming | United States

Go back to school for a day, minus the tests, stress and homework.

Each Saturday U term features lectures from three outstanding University of Wyoming professors. Following the lectures, all three professors will participate in a final roundtable discussion. Participants may attend one, two, three, or all four sessions. No registration is required, and there is no charge.

8:30 – 8:50 am: Free coffee and pastries

8:50 – 9:00 am: Welcome and opening remarks

9:00 – 10:00 am: “An Economy that Works: Measuring Immigrant Contributions to Teton County,Noah Novogrodsky, Professor of Law, University of Wyoming

Professor Noah Novogrodsky leads a team of law students conducting an economic impact study of the contributions immigrants make to Teton County. The study measures the business impact of immigrant workers, from employees in tourism and hospitality to small-business owners and investors to foreign students who are authorized to work.  Professor Novogrodsky’s discussion of the study reveals how complex immigration debates are, the unique political alliances that surround the subject and what is likely to happen or not happen on immigration matters under a Trump Administration.

10:15 – 11:15 am: “Writing the New American West: Positron Literature,Nina S. McConigley, Assistant Professor of Honors, University of Wyoming

Writing about the American West has moved well beyond literature featuring the American Old West or Frontier narratives typically set in the century spanning the late eighteenth and the late nineteenth century. In its place, a new understanding of contemporary western writing is emerging. Sometimes referred to as Positron literature, the more recent literary output of the region tends to engage in a reinterpretation of the region, calling into question the ways in which it has been defined in the past.

11:30 am – 12:30 pm: “The Biology of Sex, Gender, and Orientation,Donal Skinner, Professor and Department Chair of Zoology and Physiology, University of Wyoming

From a biological perspective, sexual development and differentiation does not neatly align with societal expectations. During the gestation process, exposure to a variety of hormones “programs” numerous sex organs—the genitalia, the brain and even the heart—to behave in different ways. Recent research elucidates some of the mechanisms guiding this programming and the rich mosaic of potential outcomes they can produce.

World Languages Day: Workshops @ University of Wyoming campus
Mar 4 @ 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM
World Languages Day: Workshops @ University of Wyoming campus

World Languages Day (WLD) introduces Wyoming foreign language students to the University of Wyoming campus, exposes them to experts from around the world, and leaves a lasting impression of friendship and global understanding. Last year, UW hosted 240 students and instructors from across the state. Languages represented include Spanish, German, French, Chinese, Japanese, English as a Second Language and American Sign Language.

Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Cody Theatre
Mar 4 @ 2:30 PM – 3:30 PM
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Cody Theatre | Cody | Wyoming | United States

Tibet and China have had a complex relationship for 1500 years. Wars have been fought, treaties signed, then ignored in the next conquest. But there was always trade. In this presentation, National Geographic writer Mark Jenkins takes us on a journey down the forgotten Tea Horse Road. For almost 1000 years there was a stone-paved road that connected Ya’an, the tea-growing capital of Sichuan province, with Lhasa, the 12,000-foot high capital of Tibet. Tea was essential to daily life in Tibet, and China’s feudal kingdoms needed war horses. For centuries China and Tibet were on equal footing, but the ascendancy of China in the second half of the 20th century has devastated Tibet and Tibetan culture. With National Geographic images, Jenkins reveals the modern lives of the Tibetans, and the Chinese, and the geopolitics that have always connected them.

A critically acclaimed author and internationally recognized journalist, Mark Jenkins covers geopolitics, the environment and adventure for National Geographic. Jenkins’ writing has won numerous awards, including the Overseas Press Club Ross Award for “The Healing Fields” story about landmines in Cambodia and a National Magazine Award for photojournalism with colleague Brint Stirton, for “Who Murdered The Mountain Gorillas” – both of which were the focus of previous World to Wyoming tours around Wyoming. Jenkins is the author of four books and his work has appeared in dozens of national and international magazines.  He has his BA in Philosophy and MS in Geography from the University of Wyoming.

Sponsored by the UW Office of Academic Affairs, Global and Area Studies, Outreach School, the Rocky Mountain Power Foundation, thinkWY | Wyoming Humanities, the Homer and Mildred Scott Foundation, Buffalo Bill Center for the West, National Wildlife Museum and our Wyoming college partners who help us bring the World to Wyoming tour around Wyoming.

Mar
5
Sun
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ National Museum of Wildlife Art
Mar 5 @ 5:30 PM – 6:30 PM
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ National Museum of Wildlife Art | Jackson | Wyoming | United States

Tibet and China have had a complex relationship for 1500 years. Wars have been fought, treaties signed, then ignored in the next conquest. But there was always trade. In this presentation, National Geographic writer Mark Jenkins takes us on a journey down the forgotten Tea Horse Road. For almost 1000 years there was a stone-paved road that connected Ya’an, the tea-growing capital of Sichuan province, with Lhasa, the 12,000-foot high capital of Tibet. Tea was essential to daily life in Tibet, and China’s feudal kingdoms needed war horses. For centuries China and Tibet were on equal footing, but the ascendancy of China in the second half of the 20th century has devastated Tibet and Tibetan culture. With National Geographic images, Jenkins reveals the modern lives of the Tibetans, and the Chinese, and the geopolitics that have always connected them.

A critically acclaimed author and internationally recognized journalist, Mark Jenkins covers geopolitics, the environment and adventure for National Geographic. Jenkins’ writing has won numerous awards, including the Overseas Press Club Ross Award for “The Healing Fields” story about landmines in Cambodia and a National Magazine Award for photojournalism with colleague Brint Stirton, for “Who Murdered The Mountain Gorillas” – both of which were the focus of previous World to Wyoming tours around Wyoming. Jenkins is the author of four books and his work has appeared in dozens of national and international magazines.  He has his BA in Philosophy and MS in Geography from the University of Wyoming.

Sponsored by the UW Office of Academic Affairs, Global and Area Studies, Outreach School, the Rocky Mountain Power Foundation, thinkWY | Wyoming Humanities, the Homer and Mildred Scott Foundation, Buffalo Bill Center for the West, National Wildlife Museum and our Wyoming college partners who help us bring the World to Wyoming tour around Wyoming.

Mar
7
Tue
“Hand to God”: a “Creation Station” Production @ University of Wyoming Ag Auditorium
Mar 7 @ 7:00 PM – 10:00 PM
"Hand to God": a "Creation Station" Production @ University of Wyoming Ag Auditorium | Laramie | Wyoming | United States

Come see The Queen’s Players perform the fresh-off-Broadway play, Hand to God, followed by an interactive talk back with scholar Lori Howe.

This dynamic play is the award-winning child of New York playwright Robert Askins.  It is a zany concept of a boy who turns to his hand puppet for comfort after the death of his father.

Following the performance, everyone will have a chance to stretch their legs, help themselves to lemonade, coffee, and tea, and enjoy the hour-long talk back session.  This play was written to challenge and encourage audience members to examine their own part in current social norms, and the talk-back will encourage audience members to question their own beliefs, churches, and parenting choices.

Mar
8
Wed
“Hand to God”: a “Creation Station” Production @ University of Wyoming Ag Auditorium
Mar 8 @ 7:00 PM – 10:00 PM
"Hand to God": a "Creation Station" Production @ University of Wyoming Ag Auditorium | Laramie | Wyoming | United States

Come see The Queen’s Players perform the fresh-off-Broadway play, Hand to God, followed by an interactive talk back with scholar Lori Howe.

This dynamic play is the award-winning child of New York playwright Robert Askins.  It is a zany concept of a boy who turns to his hand puppet for comfort after the death of his father.

Following the performance, everyone will have a chance to stretch their legs, help themselves to lemonade, coffee, and tea, and enjoy the hour-long talk back session.  This play was written to challenge and encourage audience members to examine their own part in current social norms, and the talk-back will encourage audience members to question their own beliefs, churches, and parenting choices.

We look to engage all aspects of communities through a diverse and dynamic offering of programs.

Click on any of the programs below to learn more!

ThinkWY Gatherings

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thinkWY Insight

Upcoming Insight Events: "Legends" - January 21, 2017, Cheyenne, Atlas Theater "Identity" - February 2017, Casper - in conjunction...

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Grants

Please note: As Congress has elected to extended the current continuing resolution for the federal budget, we are unable...

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