Feb
9
Thu
Read, Rant, Relate: “Disgraced” @ Relative Theatrics Studio, Room 278 of the Laramie Plains Civic Center
Feb 9 @ 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Read, Rant, Relate: "Disgraced" @ Relative Theatrics Studio, Room 278 of the Laramie Plains Civic Center | Laramie | Wyoming | United States

Experience a new piece of contemporary dramatic literature every month with Relative Theatrics. Participants will engage directly with modern plays by listening to actor-led readings of the texts, then joining discussions breaking down the thematic elements of the works and their relevance to today’s society.

In February, come discuss Ayad Akhtar’s Disgraced.  Corporate lawyer Amir Kapoor is happy, in love, and about to land the biggest career promotion of his life.  But beneath the veneer, success has come at a price.  When Amir and his artist wife, Emily, host an intimate dinner party at their Upper East Side apartment, what starts out as a friendly conversation soon escalates into something far more damaging.

Feb
15
Wed
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ University of Wyoming, Arts & Sciences Auditorium
Feb 15 @ 7:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ University of Wyoming, Arts & Sciences Auditorium | Laramie | Wyoming | United States

Tibet and China have had a complex relationship for 1500 years. Wars have been fought, treaties signed, then ignored in the next conquest. But there was always trade. In this presentation, National Geographic writer Mark Jenkins takes us on a journey down the forgotten Tea Horse Road. For almost 1000 years there was a stone-paved road that connected Ya’an, the tea-growing capital of Sichuan province, with Lhasa, the 12,000-foot high capital of Tibet. Tea was essential to daily life in Tibet, and China’s feudal kingdoms needed war horses. For centuries China and Tibet were on equal footing, but the ascendancy of China in the second half of the 20th century has devastated Tibet and Tibetan culture. With National Geographic images, Jenkins reveals the modern lives of the Tibetans, and the Chinese, and the geopolitics that have always connected them.

A critically acclaimed author and internationally recognized journalist, Mark Jenkins covers geopolitics, the environment and adventure for National Geographic. Jenkins’ writing has won numerous awards, including the Overseas Press Club Ross Award for “The Healing Fields” story about landmines in Cambodia and a National Magazine Award for photojournalism with colleague Brint Stirton, for “Who Murdered The Mountain Gorillas” – both of which were the focus of previous World to Wyoming tours around Wyoming. Jenkins is the author of four books and his work has appeared in dozens of national and international magazines.  He has his BA in Philosophy and MS in Geography from the University of Wyoming.

Sponsored by the UW Office of Academic Affairs, Global and Area Studies, Outreach School, the Rocky Mountain Power Foundation, thinkWY | Wyoming Humanities, the Homer and Mildred Scott Foundation, Buffalo Bill Center for the West, National Wildlife Museum and our Wyoming college partners who help us bring the World to Wyoming tour around Wyoming.

Mar
7
Tue
“Creation Station” Production: “Hand to God” @ Blossom Yoga Studio
Mar 7 @ 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Join The Queen’s Players in a production of the fresh-off-of-Broadway play Hand to God, followed by an interactive talk-back with scholar Lori Howe.

This dynamic play is the award-winning child of New York playwright, Robert Askins.  It is a zany concept of a boy who turns to his hand puppet for comfort after the death of his father.  Following the performance, everyone will have a chance to stretch their legs, help themselves to lemonade, coffee, and tea, and enjoy the hour-long talk back.  This open-dialogue portion will focus on a discussion of the play’s conflicts and impact within our own world.

Mar
8
Wed
“Creation Station” Production: “Hand to God” @ Blossom Yoga Studio
Mar 8 @ 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Join The Queen’s Players in a production of the fresh-off-of-Broadway play Hand to God, followed by an interactive talk-back with scholar Lori Howe.

This dynamic play is the award-winning child of New York playwright, Robert Askins.  It is a zany concept of a boy who turns to his hand puppet for comfort after the death of his father.  Following the performance, everyone will have a chance to stretch their legs, help themselves to lemonade, coffee, and tea, and enjoy the hour-long talk back.  This open-dialogue portion will focus on a discussion of the play’s conflicts and impact within our own world.

Mar
9
Thu
Read, Rant, Relate: “Our House” @ Relative Theatrics Studio, Room 278 of the Laramie Plains Civic Center
Mar 9 @ 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Read, Rant, Relate: "Our House" @ Relative Theatrics Studio, Room 278 of the Laramie Plains Civic Center | Laramie | Wyoming | United States

Experience a new piece of contemporary dramatic literature every month with Relative Theatrics. Participants will engage directly with modern plays by listening to actor-led readings of the texts, then joining discussions breaking down the thematic elements of the works and their relevance to today’s society.

In March, come discuss Theresa Rebeck’s Our House.  When reality collides with reality TV, we find ourselves front and center in a drama that holds the nation riveted.  The play is a deliciously scathing new comedy that takes on a media-obsessed culture intent on turning even the most sobering crisis into sexy entertainment.  A darkly comic look at America’s obsession with “reality” television.

Mar
23
Thu
They Were Good Americans with Richard Maturi @ Albany County Library
Mar 23 @ 6:30 PM – 8:00 PM
They Were Good Americans with Richard Maturi @ Albany County Library  | Laramie | Wyoming | United States

Join Richard Maturi for “They Were Good Americans”, the true to life story of the Kipling’s Error B-17 crew during World War II.  Based on the World War II exploits of Captain Lloyd Brooks Mitchell, B-17 navigator and father of Dr. Brooks Mitchell, professor emeritus at the University of Wyoming Business School. Ride along with the crew of Kipling’s Error, the first B-17 crew to complete 25 successful combat missions and return to the states to train other airmen. The Kipling’s Error crew diaries form the basis of the program and provide insight into the sacrifices made by those who serve.

Apr
13
Thu
Read, Rant, Relate: “The Flick” @ Relative Theatrics Studio, Room 278 of the Laramie Plains Civic Center
Apr 13 @ 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Read, Rant, Relate: "The Flick" @ Relative Theatrics Studio, Room 278 of the Laramie Plains Civic Center | Laramie | Wyoming | United States

Experience a new piece of contemporary dramatic literature every month with Relative Theatrics. Participants will engage directly with modern plays by listening to actor-led readings of the texts, then joining discussions breaking down the thematic elements of the works and their relevance to today’s society.

In April, come discuss Annie Baker’s The Flick.  In a run-down movie theater in central Massachusetts, three underpaid employees mop the floors and attend to one of the last 35 millimeter film projectors in the state.  Their tiny battles and not-so-tiny heartbreaks play out in the empty aisles, becoming more gripping than the lackluster, second-run movies on screen.  With keen insight and a finely-tuned comic eye, The Flick is a hilarious and heart-rending cry for authenticity in a fast-changing world.

May
11
Thu
Read, Rant, Relate: “The Humans” @ Relative Theatrics Studio, Room 278 of the Laramie Plains Civic Center
May 11 @ 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Read, Rant, Relate: "The Humans" @ Relative Theatrics Studio, Room 278 of the Laramie Plains Civic Center | Laramie | Wyoming | United States

Experience a new piece of contemporary dramatic literature every month with Relative Theatrics. Participants will engage directly with modern plays by listening to actor-led readings of the texts, then joining discussions breaking down the thematic elements of the works and their relevance to today’s society.

In May, come discuss Stephen Karam’s The Humans.  “…what is so amazing about The Humans (and this is a really amazing new play) is that while Karam’s writing never romanticizes these characters nor minimizes the struggles of those who find themselves lower-middle class and older in years in today’s increasingly elitist and divisive America, he focuses on their connections with each other.  You watch them drive each other crazy, but you also want them at your own dinner, quite badly.  You’ll be surprised how much.  It is hard to think of another play that has dealt with these realities of life as it is lived in ordinary America–that faraway country Broadway so often chooses to ignore in favor of the bourgeoisie problems of one of the Upper Sides–with such compassion.”  -Chris Jones, The Chicago Tribune

May
17
Wed
Magic Carpet Made of Steel with Bill Rossiter @ Centennial Branch Library
May 17 @ 5:30 PM – 7:00 PM
Magic Carpet Made of Steel with Bill Rossiter @ Centennial Branch Library | Centennial | Wyoming | United States

Join educator and songster Bill Rossiter a musical presntation; Magic Carpet made of Steel. Rossiter uses Songs and stories to help recapture the wonder railroads once inspired. Using tunes and yarns this presentation explores what railroads meant to the West in particular and the US in general in both the distant and not so distant past.

Jun
21
Wed
Kit Carson in Wyoming and the West with John D. Farr @ Nici Self Museum
Jun 21 @ 5:30 PM – 7:00 PM

Join John D. Farr, a lifelong student of Kit Carson and his times for “Kit Carson in Wyoming and the West”. “Kit” Carson, mountain man fur trapper, explorer, and military leader, did not read or write but spoke 12 languages, including Native American languages and is estimated to have traveled 50,000 miles on foot in the western territories. Learn about the life and times of the famous but unknown “Kit” Carson which included California statehood, the Civil War, early western settlement and war with Mexico.