Mar
1
Wed
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Sheridan College, Whitney Concert Hall
Mar 1 @ 7:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Sheridan College, Whitney Concert Hall | Sheridan | Wyoming | United States

Tibet and China have had a complex relationship for 1500 years. Wars have been fought, treaties signed, then ignored in the next conquest. But there was always trade. In this presentation, National Geographic writer Mark Jenkins takes us on a journey down the forgotten Tea Horse Road. For almost 1000 years there was a stone-paved road that connected Ya’an, the tea-growing capital of Sichuan province, with Lhasa, the 12,000-foot high capital of Tibet. Tea was essential to daily life in Tibet, and China’s feudal kingdoms needed war horses. For centuries China and Tibet were on equal footing, but the ascendancy of China in the second half of the 20th century has devastated Tibet and Tibetan culture. With National Geographic images, Jenkins reveals the modern lives of the Tibetans, and the Chinese, and the geopolitics that have always connected them.

A critically acclaimed author and internationally recognized journalist, Mark Jenkins covers geopolitics, the environment and adventure for National Geographic. Jenkins’ writing has won numerous awards, including the Overseas Press Club Ross Award for “The Healing Fields” story about landmines in Cambodia and a National Magazine Award for photojournalism with colleague Brint Stirton, for “Who Murdered The Mountain Gorillas” – both of which were the focus of previous World to Wyoming tours around Wyoming. Jenkins is the author of four books and his work has appeared in dozens of national and international magazines.  He has his BA in Philosophy and MS in Geography from the University of Wyoming.

Sponsored by the UW Office of Academic Affairs, Global and Area Studies, Outreach School, the Rocky Mountain Power Foundation, thinkWY | Wyoming Humanities, the Homer and Mildred Scott Foundation, Buffalo Bill Center for the West, National Wildlife Museum and our Wyoming college partners who help us bring the World to Wyoming tour around Wyoming.

Mar
2
Thu
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Northwest College, Yellowstone Building
Mar 2 @ 6:30 PM – 7:30 PM
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Northwest College, Yellowstone Building | Powell | Wyoming | United States

Tibet and China have had a complex relationship for 1500 years. Wars have been fought, treaties signed, then ignored in the next conquest. But there was always trade. In this presentation, National Geographic writer Mark Jenkins takes us on a journey down the forgotten Tea Horse Road. For almost 1000 years there was a stone-paved road that connected Ya’an, the tea-growing capital of Sichuan province, with Lhasa, the 12,000-foot high capital of Tibet. Tea was essential to daily life in Tibet, and China’s feudal kingdoms needed war horses. For centuries China and Tibet were on equal footing, but the ascendancy of China in the second half of the 20th century has devastated Tibet and Tibetan culture. With National Geographic images, Jenkins reveals the modern lives of the Tibetans, and the Chinese, and the geopolitics that have always connected them.

A critically acclaimed author and internationally recognized journalist, Mark Jenkins covers geopolitics, the environment and adventure for National Geographic. Jenkins’ writing has won numerous awards, including the Overseas Press Club Ross Award for “The Healing Fields” story about landmines in Cambodia and a National Magazine Award for photojournalism with colleague Brint Stirton, for “Who Murdered The Mountain Gorillas” – both of which were the focus of previous World to Wyoming tours around Wyoming. Jenkins is the author of four books and his work has appeared in dozens of national and international magazines.  He has his BA in Philosophy and MS in Geography from the University of Wyoming.

Sponsored by the UW Office of Academic Affairs, Global and Area Studies, Outreach School, the Rocky Mountain Power Foundation, thinkWY | Wyoming Humanities, the Homer and Mildred Scott Foundation, Buffalo Bill Center for the West, National Wildlife Museum and our Wyoming college partners who help us bring the World to Wyoming tour around Wyoming.

Mar
4
Sat
Saturday U Jackson @ National Museum of Wildlife Art
Mar 4 @ 8:30 AM – 1:30 PM
Saturday U Jackson @ National Museum of Wildlife Art | Jackson | Wyoming | United States

Go back to school for a day, minus the tests, stress and homework.

Each Saturday U term features lectures from three outstanding University of Wyoming professors. Following the lectures, all three professors will participate in a final roundtable discussion. Participants may attend one, two, three, or all four sessions. No registration is required, and there is no charge.

Please check back for details on specific speakers!

Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Cody Theatre
Mar 4 @ 2:30 PM – 3:30 PM
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Cody Theatre | Cody | Wyoming | United States

Tibet and China have had a complex relationship for 1500 years. Wars have been fought, treaties signed, then ignored in the next conquest. But there was always trade. In this presentation, National Geographic writer Mark Jenkins takes us on a journey down the forgotten Tea Horse Road. For almost 1000 years there was a stone-paved road that connected Ya’an, the tea-growing capital of Sichuan province, with Lhasa, the 12,000-foot high capital of Tibet. Tea was essential to daily life in Tibet, and China’s feudal kingdoms needed war horses. For centuries China and Tibet were on equal footing, but the ascendancy of China in the second half of the 20th century has devastated Tibet and Tibetan culture. With National Geographic images, Jenkins reveals the modern lives of the Tibetans, and the Chinese, and the geopolitics that have always connected them.

A critically acclaimed author and internationally recognized journalist, Mark Jenkins covers geopolitics, the environment and adventure for National Geographic. Jenkins’ writing has won numerous awards, including the Overseas Press Club Ross Award for “The Healing Fields” story about landmines in Cambodia and a National Magazine Award for photojournalism with colleague Brint Stirton, for “Who Murdered The Mountain Gorillas” – both of which were the focus of previous World to Wyoming tours around Wyoming. Jenkins is the author of four books and his work has appeared in dozens of national and international magazines.  He has his BA in Philosophy and MS in Geography from the University of Wyoming.

Sponsored by the UW Office of Academic Affairs, Global and Area Studies, Outreach School, the Rocky Mountain Power Foundation, thinkWY | Wyoming Humanities, the Homer and Mildred Scott Foundation, Buffalo Bill Center for the West, National Wildlife Museum and our Wyoming college partners who help us bring the World to Wyoming tour around Wyoming.

Mar
5
Sun
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ National Museum of Wildlife Art
Mar 5 @ 5:30 PM – 6:30 PM
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ National Museum of Wildlife Art | Jackson | Wyoming | United States

Tibet and China have had a complex relationship for 1500 years. Wars have been fought, treaties signed, then ignored in the next conquest. But there was always trade. In this presentation, National Geographic writer Mark Jenkins takes us on a journey down the forgotten Tea Horse Road. For almost 1000 years there was a stone-paved road that connected Ya’an, the tea-growing capital of Sichuan province, with Lhasa, the 12,000-foot high capital of Tibet. Tea was essential to daily life in Tibet, and China’s feudal kingdoms needed war horses. For centuries China and Tibet were on equal footing, but the ascendancy of China in the second half of the 20th century has devastated Tibet and Tibetan culture. With National Geographic images, Jenkins reveals the modern lives of the Tibetans, and the Chinese, and the geopolitics that have always connected them.

A critically acclaimed author and internationally recognized journalist, Mark Jenkins covers geopolitics, the environment and adventure for National Geographic. Jenkins’ writing has won numerous awards, including the Overseas Press Club Ross Award for “The Healing Fields” story about landmines in Cambodia and a National Magazine Award for photojournalism with colleague Brint Stirton, for “Who Murdered The Mountain Gorillas” – both of which were the focus of previous World to Wyoming tours around Wyoming. Jenkins is the author of four books and his work has appeared in dozens of national and international magazines.  He has his BA in Philosophy and MS in Geography from the University of Wyoming.

Sponsored by the UW Office of Academic Affairs, Global and Area Studies, Outreach School, the Rocky Mountain Power Foundation, thinkWY | Wyoming Humanities, the Homer and Mildred Scott Foundation, Buffalo Bill Center for the West, National Wildlife Museum and our Wyoming college partners who help us bring the World to Wyoming tour around Wyoming.

Mar
7
Tue
Spies, Secrecy, and the CIA in a Democracy: How it all works! with Pat Stuart @ Northwest College
Mar 7 @ 6:30 PM – 8:00 PM
Spies, Secrecy, and the CIA in a Democracy:  How it all works! with Pat Stuart @ Northwest College | Powell | Wyoming | United States

Who are America’s spies and what do they do?  Learn how America’s intelligence community developed, how its spies work, and the bureaucratic and administrative checks and balances that guard against misuse of their talents.  Then discuss how you see an espionage organization fitting into the security needs of our nation.  The next time you hear allegations—good or bad—about the U.S. intelligence community, you will feel better prepared to draw your own conclusions.  Presented by retired CIA Station Chief, Pat Stuart who shares personal insights based on here experiences of life as a covert warrior.

“Creation Station” Production: “Hand to God” @ Blossom Yoga Studio
Mar 7 @ 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Join The Queen’s Players in a production of the fresh-off-of-Broadway play Hand to God, followed by an interactive talk-back with scholar Lori Howe.

This dynamic play is the award-winning child of New York playwright, Robert Askins.  It is a zany concept of a boy who turns to his hand puppet for comfort after the death of his father.  Following the performance, everyone will have a chance to stretch their legs, help themselves to lemonade, coffee, and tea, and enjoy the hour-long talk back.  This open-dialogue portion will focus on a discussion of the play’s conflicts and impact within our own world.

Mar
8
Wed
“Creation Station” Production: “Hand to God” @ Blossom Yoga Studio
Mar 8 @ 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Join The Queen’s Players in a production of the fresh-off-of-Broadway play Hand to God, followed by an interactive talk-back with scholar Lori Howe.

This dynamic play is the award-winning child of New York playwright, Robert Askins.  It is a zany concept of a boy who turns to his hand puppet for comfort after the death of his father.  Following the performance, everyone will have a chance to stretch their legs, help themselves to lemonade, coffee, and tea, and enjoy the hour-long talk back.  This open-dialogue portion will focus on a discussion of the play’s conflicts and impact within our own world.