Sep
30
Sat
“Ferret Town” documentary screening @ Buffalo Bill Center of West
Sep 30 @ 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM
"Ferret Town" documentary screening @ Buffalo Bill Center of West | Cody | Wyoming | United States

Come see “Ferret Town,” with guest speakers and a live “Ambassador” black-footed ferret from the National Black-Footed Ferret Conservation Center.

In 1979 the black footed ferret was thought to be extinct – gone forever from the great plains. Then in 1981, a small population was discovered near the remote town of Meeteetse, Wyoming, inciting a race to recover the species from the remaining 18 individuals. In this documentary, captive breeding programs, disease outbreaks, habitat protection, political hurdles and diverse cultural beliefs lead up to the long awaited return of black footed ferrets to a town that was reshaped by their discovery. “Ferret Town” presents one of the best conservation stories in the United States, posing the question- how far will we go to save one species?

This film is produced by The Content Lab LLC, an independent production company based in Wyoming, with support from The Meeteetse Museum Foundation, thinkWY | Wyoming Humanities, and the The Wyoming Cultural Trust Fund, and with the cooperation of the US Fish and Wildlife Service, the Wyoming Game and Fish Department, and private landowners.

Oct
1
Sun
“Ferret Town” documentary screening @ Center for the Arts
Oct 1 @ 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM
"Ferret Town" documentary screening @ Center for the Arts | Jackson | Wyoming | United States

Come see “Ferret Town” at the Jackson Hole WILD Film Fest, including guest speakers and a live “Ambassador” black-footed ferret from the National Black-Footed Ferret Conservation Center.

In 1979 the black footed ferret was thought to be extinct – gone forever from the great plains. Then in 1981, a small population was discovered near the remote town of Meeteetse, Wyoming, inciting a race to recover the species from the remaining 18 individuals. In this documentary, captive breeding programs, disease outbreaks, habitat protection, political hurdles and diverse cultural beliefs lead up to the long awaited return of black footed ferrets to a town that was reshaped by their discovery. “Ferret Town” presents one of the best conservation stories in the United States, posing the question- how far will we go to save one species?

This film is produced by The Content Lab LLC, an independent production company based in Wyoming, with support from The Meeteetse Museum Foundation, thinkWY | Wyoming Humanities, and the The Wyoming Cultural Trust Fund, and with the cooperation of the US Fish and Wildlife Service, the Wyoming Game and Fish Department, and private landowners.

Oct
2
Mon
“Ferret Town” documentary screening @ Berry Biodiversity Conservation Center
Oct 2 @ 5:00 PM – 7:00 PM
"Ferret Town" documentary screening @ Berry Biodiversity Conservation Center | Laramie | Wyoming | United States

Come see “Ferret Town,” with a live “Ambassador” black-footed ferret from the National Black-Footed Ferret Conservation Center.

In 1979 the black footed ferret was thought to be extinct – gone forever from the great plains. Then in 1981, a small population was discovered near the remote town of Meeteetse, Wyoming, inciting a race to recover the species from the remaining 18 individuals. In this documentary, captive breeding programs, disease outbreaks, habitat protection, political hurdles and diverse cultural beliefs lead up to the long awaited return of black footed ferrets to a town that was reshaped by their discovery. “Ferret Town” presents one of the best conservation stories in the United States, posing the question- how far will we go to save one species?

This film is produced by The Content Lab LLC, an independent production company based in Wyoming, with support from The Meeteetse Museum Foundation, thinkWY | Wyoming Humanities, and the The Wyoming Cultural Trust Fund, and with the cooperation of the US Fish and Wildlife Service, the Wyoming Game and Fish Department, and private landowners.

“Home Front in Wyoming” — UW Libraries Lecture Series @ Alice Hardie Stevens Center
Oct 2 @ 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM
"Home Front in Wyoming" -- UW Libraries Lecture Series @ Alice Hardie Stevens Center | Laramie | Wyoming | United States

Tom Rea will discuss civilian life in Wyoming during the years immediately before, during, and after the nation’s engagement in the war in 1917 and 1918.  He will share anecdotes about the Red Cross fundraisers, the war bond drives, the anti-German sentiment and activities of the One Hundred Percent American Society, the murder trial of John Leibig, the enforcement of the Sedition Act, victory gardens, and more that occurred in Wyoming.

Tom Rea is the Editor of WyoHistory.org, a project of the Wyoming State Historical Society.  This program is sponsored in part bye the Laramie Plains Museum.

Oct
4
Wed
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Western Wyoming College, Room 1302
Oct 4 @ 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Western Wyoming College, Room 1302

Tibet and China have had a complex relationship for 1500 years. Wars have been fought, treaties signed, then ignored in the next conquest. But there was always trade. In this presentation, National Geographic writer Mark Jenkins takes us on a journey down the forgotten Tea Horse Road. For almost 1000 years there was a stone-paved road that connected Ya’an, the tea-growing capital of Sichuan province, with Lhasa, the 12,000-foot high capital of Tibet. Tea was essential to daily life in Tibet, and China’s feudal kingdoms needed war horses. For centuries China and Tibet were on equal footing, but the ascendancy of China in the second half of the 20th century has devastated Tibet and Tibetan culture. With National Geographic images, Jenkins reveals the modern lives of the Tibetans, and the Chinese, and the geopolitics that have always connected them.

A critically acclaimed author and internationally recognized journalist, Mark Jenkins covers geopolitics, the environment and adventure for National Geographic. Jenkins’ writing has won numerous awards, including the Overseas Press Club Ross Award for “The Healing Fields” story about landmines in Cambodia and a National Magazine Award for photojournalism with colleague Brint Stirton, for “Who Murdered The Mountain Gorillas” – both of which were the focus of previous World to Wyoming tours around Wyoming. Jenkins is the author of four books and his work has appeared in dozens of national and international magazines.  He has his BA in Philosophy and MS in Geography from the University of Wyoming.

Sponsored by the UW Office of Academic Affairs, Global and Area Studies, Outreach School, the Rocky Mountain Power Foundation, thinkWY | Wyoming Humanities, the Homer and Mildred Scott Foundation, Buffalo Bill Center for the West, National Wildlife Museum and our Wyoming college partners who help us bring the World to Wyoming tour around Wyoming.

Oct
5
Thu
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Lander Valley High School
Oct 5 @ 6:30 PM – 8:00 PM
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Lander Valley High School

Tibet and China have had a complex relationship for 1500 years. Wars have been fought, treaties signed, then ignored in the next conquest. But there was always trade. In this presentation, National Geographic writer Mark Jenkins takes us on a journey down the forgotten Tea Horse Road. For almost 1000 years there was a stone-paved road that connected Ya’an, the tea-growing capital of Sichuan province, with Lhasa, the 12,000-foot high capital of Tibet. Tea was essential to daily life in Tibet, and China’s feudal kingdoms needed war horses. For centuries China and Tibet were on equal footing, but the ascendancy of China in the second half of the 20th century has devastated Tibet and Tibetan culture. With National Geographic images, Jenkins reveals the modern lives of the Tibetans, and the Chinese, and the geopolitics that have always connected them.

A critically acclaimed author and internationally recognized journalist, Mark Jenkins covers geopolitics, the environment and adventure for National Geographic. Jenkins’ writing has won numerous awards, including the Overseas Press Club Ross Award for “The Healing Fields” story about landmines in Cambodia and a National Magazine Award for photojournalism with colleague Brint Stirton, for “Who Murdered The Mountain Gorillas” – both of which were the focus of previous World to Wyoming tours around Wyoming. Jenkins is the author of four books and his work has appeared in dozens of national and international magazines.  He has his BA in Philosophy and MS in Geography from the University of Wyoming.

Sponsored by the UW Office of Academic Affairs, Global and Area Studies, Outreach School, the Rocky Mountain Power Foundation, thinkWY | Wyoming Humanities, the Homer and Mildred Scott Foundation, Buffalo Bill Center for the West, National Wildlife Museum and our Wyoming college partners who help us bring the World to Wyoming tour around Wyoming.

Oct
14
Sat
Saturday University Jackson @ National Museum of Wildlife Art
Oct 14 @ 8:30 AM – 12:30 PM
Saturday University Jackson @ National Museum of Wildlife Art | Jackson | Wyoming | United States

Go back to school for a day, minus the tests, stress and homework.

Each Saturday U term features lectures from three outstanding University of Wyoming professors. Following the lectures, all three professors will participate in a final round-table discussion. Participants may attend one, two, three, or all four sessions. No registration is required, and there is no charge.

8:30 am: Coffee and donuts

9:00 am: Sour Whiskey, Cheap Wine, Plastic Milk, and Snake Oil: Food Fraud across National and International Supply Chains,” Mariah Ehmke, Associate Professor of Agricultural and Applied Economics, University of Wyoming

Food fraud occurs when companies practice illegal deception in the production and marketing of goods for economic gain. Such deception often includes the  adulteration of the foodstuffs themselves. While comprehensive cost estimates of food fraud are not currently available, individual cases have been economically devastating not only to consumers, but also to producers, corporations, and even entire countries. In this Saturday University lecture, you will learn more about the details of and conditions surrounding fraud in the food industry, take a look at how such fraud may affect Wyoming consumers and producers, and finally explore policy options that could help reduce food fraud.

10:15 am: “The Fifth Beginning: What Six Million Years of Human History Can Tell Us About the Future,” Robert Kelly, Professor of Anthropology, University of Wyoming

This lecture discusses the four major “beginnings” of human history – the origins of technology, culture, agriculture, and the state—and presents evidence that humanity is entering a fifth beginning, one that can be expected to mark dramatic changes in world economy, war, culture, and governance.

11:30 am: “Giving a Hoot about Wildlife Genetics: Enhancing the Survival of Western Wyoming’s Bighorn Sheep and Owls,” Holly Ernest, Wyoming Excellence Chair, Professor of Veterinary Sciences, University of Wyoming

Genetic diversity is key to the long-term survival of a healthy population of any animal species. This is even more true for threatened species near Jackson, like Bighorn Sheep and Great Gray Owls.  Professor Ernest and her lab study these herds and flocks to work out their genome and help wildlife and land managers evaluate ways to assist in their long-term survival.

Presentations followed by a round-table discussion with speakers over a free lunch.

Saturday University in Jackson is sponsored by the University of Wyoming, Wyoming Humanities, the National Museum of Wildlife Art, and Central Wyoming College.

Oct
20
Fri
A Cultural History of Devils Tower/ Bear’s Tipi @ Gryphon Theatre, Laramie Plains Civic Center
Oct 20 @ 6:30 PM – 9:00 PM
A Cultural History of Devils Tower/ Bear's Tipi @ Gryphon Theatre, Laramie Plains Civic Center

Devils Tower/Bear’s Tipi has been a part of American culture since its designation as a sacred site to American Indians, long before New World settlers marveled at its geologic splendor.  In 1906, it became the United States’ very first National Monument through the Antiquities Act of Theodore Roosevelt’s Presidential administration.  In 1977, it entered the annals of popular culture when it served as the beacon to extraterrestrial life in Steven Spielberg’s sci-fi classic Close Encounters of the Third Kind.

This panel discussion of the cultural history of Devils Tower will be followed by a 40th anniversary screening of Close Encounters of the Third Kind.  The ninety-minute discussion will include talks by panelists and question-and-answer session with audience members.  The panelists will include: UW Professor of Religious Studies Dr. Paul V.M. Flesher, UW American Indian Studies Program Director Dr. Angela Jaime, and folklorist and UW American Studies Professor Dr. John Dorst.  Subjects to be covered in the discussion will be: Bear’s Tipi/Devils Tower’s significance to American Indians and the native legends regarding its formation; the history of Devils Tower as a site for amateur and professional rock climbers; the headline-grabbing parachute jump onto Devils Tower by George Hopkins that necessitated a rescue operation in October 1941; American Indians’ struggle to keep the site sacred despite its draw as  a tourist attraction; and Devils Tower’s appropriation by the film Close Encounters and its textual transformation to that of a religious icon.

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