Oct
27
Thu
Saturday U Gillette @ Campbell County Public Library
Oct 27 @ 5:30 PM – 9:00 PM
Saturday U Gillette @ Campbell County Public Library | Gillette | Wyoming | United States

Go back to school for a day! Each Saturday U term features lectures from three outstanding University of Wyoming professors. Following the lectures, all three professors will participate in a final round-table discussion. Participants may attend one, two, three, or all four sessions. No registration is required, and there is no charge.

5:30 – 5:55 pm: Light meal / refreshments

6:00 pm: Welcome and opening remarks

6:05 pm: “What Could Democracy Be?,Scott Henkel, Assistant Professor – English, College of Arts & Science, University of Wyoming

As we approach the presidential election, Scott Henkel’s lecture will examine how writers and thinkers have understood democracy and have imagined its possibilities. What has democracy been in the United States, in ancient Athens, in cooperative workplaces, even on pirate ships and space ships? Who should participate in the democratic process, and what should that participation be? What might the future of democracy look like?

6:50 pm: “An Introduction to Islam for the Equality State,” Seth Ward, Academic Professional Lecturer – Religious Studies, College of Arts & Science, University of Wyoming

Within more than a billion adherents, Islam is the second largest religion in the world and the fastest growing religion in the USA. But there is surprisingly little knowledge of Islam in our media as opposed to alarmist rumor. Dr. Ward, an expert in both Islam and Judaism, will dispel the myths and falsehoods and provide a simple and accurate description of Islam and its core beliefs and practices.

7:35 pm: “Climate, Drought, and Water in the West,” Jacqueline J. Shinker, Associate Professor –  Geography, College of Arts & Science, University of Wyoming

The intermountain west contains eight of the ten driest states in the country. Much of our water resources in the region are dependent upon the natural reservoirs of seasonal mountain snowpack. Costly droughts in the region impact water resources for agriculture, energy, recreation, and municipalities. This presentation will provide context for recent droughts and the impacts of climate on past, present, and future water resources in the West.

Nov
13
Sun
“The Drift,” a film by Geoff O’Gara @ Buffalo Bill Center for the West
Nov 13 @ 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
"The Drift," a film by Geoff O'Gara @ Buffalo Bill Center for the West | Cody | Wyoming | United States

The Green River Drift is a Wyoming cattle drive that’s been going on for more than 100 years. It begins down in the meadows and on the mesas where the Green River twists and turns between the Wyoming Range and the Wind River Mountains. On horseback, ranchers and wranglers nudge the cattle along a trail that runs in some cases 100 miles up to the high country near the Continental Divide, over 10,000 feet above sea level. The cattle spend the summer in the high mountain meadows – the largest unfenced grazing allotment on U.S. Forest Service land in the nation. When the air chills in the fall, and snow can fly suddenly and abundantly, the experienced mother cows lead the way home, without help.

It’s a way of life precarious but persistent. Ranch families in the Green River Valley live stubbornly independent lives despite an influx of second-home hobby ranchers, tourists, and natural gas drilling rigs. But when they move and tend their cattle on this last remnant of open range, they are deeply dependent on each other. They have to deal with harsh weather and isolation, with grizzly bears and wolves, with befuddling regulations and complex economics, and with the hardest challenge of all – how to get their children, or their new neighbors, to join in this hard but rewarding way of life.

This is a documentary about a way of life that many Americans think doesn’t exist anymore, except in movies. But it does. And here’s the movie.

This film was funded in part by grant from the Wyoming Humanities.

Nov
14
Mon
“The Drift,” a film by Geoff O’Gara @ Lander Library
Nov 14 @ 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
"The Drift," a film by Geoff O'Gara @ Lander Library | Lander | Wyoming | United States

The Green River Drift is a Wyoming cattle drive that’s been going on for more than 100 years. It begins down in the meadows and on the mesas where the Green River twists and turns between the Wyoming Range and the Wind River Mountains. On horseback, ranchers and wranglers nudge the cattle along a trail that runs in some cases 100 miles up to the high country near the Continental Divide, over 10,000 feet above sea level. The cattle spend the summer in the high mountain meadows – the largest unfenced grazing allotment on U.S. Forest Service land in the nation. When the air chills in the fall, and snow can fly suddenly and abundantly, the experienced mother cows lead the way home, without help.

It’s a way of life precarious but persistent. Ranch families in the Green River Valley live stubbornly independent lives despite an influx of second-home hobby ranchers, tourists, and natural gas drilling rigs. But when they move and tend their cattle on this last remnant of open range, they are deeply dependent on each other. They have to deal with harsh weather and isolation, with grizzly bears and wolves, with befuddling regulations and complex economics, and with the hardest challenge of all – how to get their children, or their new neighbors, to join in this hard but rewarding way of life.

This is a documentary about a way of life that many Americans think doesn’t exist anymore, except in movies. But it does. And here’s the movie.

This film was funded in part by grant from the Wyoming Humanities.

Nov
15
Tue
“The Drift,” a film by Geoff O’Gara @ Sublette County Library
Nov 15 @ 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
"The Drift," a film by Geoff O'Gara @ Sublette County Library | Pinedale | Wyoming | United States

The Green River Drift is a Wyoming cattle drive that’s been going on for more than 100 years. It begins down in the meadows and on the mesas where the Green River twists and turns between the Wyoming Range and the Wind River Mountains. On horseback, ranchers and wranglers nudge the cattle along a trail that runs in some cases 100 miles up to the high country near the Continental Divide, over 10,000 feet above sea level. The cattle spend the summer in the high mountain meadows – the largest unfenced grazing allotment on U.S. Forest Service land in the nation. When the air chills in the fall, and snow can fly suddenly and abundantly, the experienced mother cows lead the way home, without help.

It’s a way of life precarious but persistent. Ranch families in the Green River Valley live stubbornly independent lives despite an influx of second-home hobby ranchers, tourists, and natural gas drilling rigs. But when they move and tend their cattle on this last remnant of open range, they are deeply dependent on each other. They have to deal with harsh weather and isolation, with grizzly bears and wolves, with befuddling regulations and complex economics, and with the hardest challenge of all – how to get their children, or their new neighbors, to join in this hard but rewarding way of life.

This is a documentary about a way of life that many Americans think doesn’t exist anymore, except in movies. But it does. And here’s the movie.

This film was funded in part by a grant from the Wyoming Humanities.

Dec
15
Thu
Read, Rant, Relate: “In The Next Room, or the Vibrator Play” @ Relative Theatrics Studio, Room 278 of the Laramie Plains Civic Center
Dec 15 @ 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Read, Rant, Relate: "In The Next Room, or the Vibrator Play" @ Relative Theatrics Studio, Room 278 of the Laramie Plains Civic Center | Laramie | Wyoming | United States

Experience a new piece of contemporary dramatic literature every month with Relative Theatrics. Participants will engage directly with modern plays by listening to actor-led readings of the texts, then joining discussions breaking down the thematic elements of the works and their relevance to today’s society.

In December, come discuss Sarah Ruhl’s In the Next Room, or the Vibrator Play.  The play is a comedy about marriage, intimacy, and electricity.  Set in the 1880s at the dawn of the age of electricity and based on the bizarre historical fact that doctors used vibrators to treat “hysterical” women (and sometimes men), the play centers on a doctor and his wife and how his new therapy affects their entire household and calls on them to examine the nature of marriage and what it truly means to love someone.

Dec
17
Sat
Battle of the Hundred in the Hand 150th Anniversary: Battle Reenactment @ Fort Phil Kearny
Dec 17 @ 12:00 PM – 2:00 PM

Depiction and Narrative Of Battle including mounted warrior and living historians. Shuttle to battlefield begins at 10 a.m. Event at noon. Wear warm clothing, bring a chair, binoculars, and snack.

hundred-in-the-hand-posterweb

Dec
21
Wed
Battle of the Hundred in the Hand: Honoring Those Who Fought @ Fort Phil Kearny
Dec 21 @ 12:00 PM – 12:00 PM

Laying of the ceremonial objects, remarks from Lakota, Cheyenne, Arapaho, 18th Infantry representatives, victory songs/drumming, and bugling.

hundred-in-the-hand-posterweb

Jan
19
Thu
Read, Rant, Relate: “Red Light Winter” @ Relative Theatrics Studio, Room 278 of the Laramie Plains Civic Center
Jan 19 @ 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Read, Rant, Relate: "Red Light Winter" @ Relative Theatrics Studio, Room 278 of the Laramie Plains Civic Center | Laramie | Wyoming | United States

Experience a new piece of contemporary dramatic literature every month with Relative Theatrics. Participants will engage directly with modern plays by listening to actor-led readings of the texts, then joining discussions breaking down the thematic elements of the works and their relevance to today’s society.

In January, come discuss Adam Rapp’s Red Light Winter.  Escaping their lives in Manhattan, former college buddies Matt and Davis take off to the Netherlands and find themselves thrown into a bizarre love triangle.  But the romance they find in Europe is eventually overshadowed by the truth they discover at home.  Written with an unflinching poetic beauty, Red Light Winter is a play of sexual intrigue that explores the myriad and misguided ways we seek to fill the empty spaces inside us.