Feb
7
Tue
John Wesley Powell, Myrtle and Me: Journeys on the Colorado River with Jessica Flock @ Pine Bluffs Branch Library
Feb 7 @ 7:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Jessica chronicles John Wesley Powell’s expeditions on the Green and Colorado Rivers. She intertwines her own adventures on the Colorado River with other contemporary experiences on the river using historic documents and photographs as well as youtube videos in her presentation.

Flock holds an MA in Education from the University of Wyoming and has worked as a Substitute, ESL, Social Studies and Reading teacher and librarian in Albany County and the Cathedral Home in Laramie.  She is also a UNC Workshop facilitator.  She recently accepted the position of History Day Coordinator with the American Heritage Center at the University of Wyoming.

Feb
8
Wed
“Footnote” screening and discussion @ University of Wyoming, Classroom Building 133
Feb 8 @ 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
"Footnote" screening and discussion @ University of Wyoming, Classroom Building 133 | Laramie | Wyoming | United States

Professor Moshe Pinchuk introduces Joseph Cedar’s film Footnote, a feature film portraying a tense father-son relationship. The film is fictional, but depicts real tensions in the Israeli academic humanities—and the field portrayed is one in which Dr. Pinchuk is an active scholar. The introduction and screening will be followed by a post-film discussion.

Prof. Pinchuk’s visit to Laramie is made possible in part by a Wyoming Humanities Opportunity Grant, by the LJCC (Laramie Jewish Community center) and its Asimow Fund in Memory of Fred Homer, and by Hillel at the University of Wyoming.

 

Feb
9
Thu
Challenges of Living in a Dual-Calendar Society @ University of Wyoming, Classroom Building 103
Feb 9 @ 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Challenges of Living in a Dual-Calendar Society @ University of Wyoming, Classroom Building 103 | Laramie | Wyoming | United States

Professor Moshe Pinchuk discusses the Jewish, Islamic and Gregorian calendars, the conflicts between them, and the solutions applied in Israel, issues common to Israeli and Arab societies, and any dual-calendar cultures.    (in conjunction with RELI/HIST 3220 “Modern Middle East”)

Prof. Pinchuk directs the Center for Jewish Heritage and is Founder and Director of Doresh Zion Institute for the Jerusalem Talmud, and a member of Tzohar and Beit Hillel.

Prof. Pinchuk’s visit to Laramie is made possible in part by a Wyoming Humanities Opportunity Grant, by the LJCC (Laramie Jewish Community center) and its Asimow Fund in Memory of Fred Homer, and by Hillel at the University of Wyoming.

David and Goliath’s Combat in the Light of Single-Combat Narratives in the Illiad and other Greek sources @ University of Wyoming, Classroom Building 215
Feb 9 @ 4:10 PM – 5:30 PM
David and Goliath's Combat in the Light of Single-Combat Narratives in the Illiad and other Greek sources @ University of Wyoming, Classroom Building 215 | Laramie | Wyoming | United States

Professor Moshe Pinchuk’s talk compares the familiar Biblical story, a unique occurrence of single fighters representing opposing armies, with Greek accounts, in which champion combat is a far more frequent occurrence.

Prof. Pinchuk directs the Center for Jewish Heritage and is Founder and Director of Doresh Zion Institute for the Jerusalem Talmud, and a member of Tzohar and Beit Hillel.

Prof. Pinchuk’s visit to Laramie is made possible in part by a Wyoming Humanities Opportunity Grant, by the LJCC (Laramie Jewish Community center) and its Asimow Fund in Memory of Fred Homer, and by Hillel at the University of Wyoming.

Saturday U Gillette @ Campbell County Public Library
Feb 9 @ 5:30 PM – 8:30 PM
Saturday U Gillette @ Campbell County Public Library | Gillette | Wyoming | United States

Go back to school for a day, minus the tests, stress and homework.

Each Saturday U term features lectures from three outstanding University of Wyoming professors. Following the lectures, all three professors will participate in a final roundtable discussion. Participants may attend one, two, three, or all four sessions. No registration is required, and there is no charge.

5:30 – 5:55 pm: Light meal/refreshments

6:00 pm: Welcome and opening remarks

6:05 pm: “Leave Everything and Sing to God: Hindu Holy Women in India,Antoinette DeNapoli, Associate Professor of Religious Studies, University of Wyoming

In India, ascetics who leave behind everything to become impoverished worshipers of the divine are considered holy. Since asceticism has traditionally been a male occupation, the few female ascetics are usually overlooked.  In this presentation, we will learn about the fascinating yet little known world of female ascetics who worship through singing, storytelling, and selfless service to others. They call these practices “singing to God”—an approach by which these largely illiterate women create religious authority and earn the respect of their communities

6:50 pm: “Passing Gas: Why You May be Driving an Electric Car in the Near Future,Ray DeStefano, Industrial Electricity Instructor, Gillette College

Electric vehicles have been in use for over a century, and now they are poised for mass adoption.  With recent innovations, electric vehicles are beginning to compete with their gas counterparts in terms of performance and value.  This talk will look at the past and present state of electric vehicle technology, the hurdles to mass adoption and the reasons an eventual switch to electric is all but certain.  How will the world be changed when electric vehicles are commonplace?

7:35 pm: “Wyoming’s Heart Mountain Relocation Center: A Living Legacy,Eric Sandeen, Professor of American Studies and Director, Wyoming Institute for Humanities Research, University of Wyoming

During World War II more than 14,000 Japanese and Japanese-Americans were detained in barracks at the Heart Mountain Center between Cody and Powell in Park County, Wyoming.  After the war, eager homesteaders carted off these temporary structures and incorporated them into local farms and ranches.  Many remain to this day: some easily identifiable, others thoroughly disguised as homes, sheds, and out buildings. These barracks thus reveal the stories of two waves of population in NE Wyoming, one unwilling and the other willing. This talk will explore what these buildings reveal and how their inhabitants changed the character of Wyoming’s Big Horn Basin.

Read, Rant, Relate: “Disgraced” @ Relative Theatrics Studio, Room 278 of the Laramie Plains Civic Center
Feb 9 @ 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Read, Rant, Relate: "Disgraced" @ Relative Theatrics Studio, Room 278 of the Laramie Plains Civic Center | Laramie | Wyoming | United States

Experience a new piece of contemporary dramatic literature every month with Relative Theatrics. Participants will engage directly with modern plays by listening to actor-led readings of the texts, then joining discussions breaking down the thematic elements of the works and their relevance to today’s society.

In February, come discuss Ayad Akhtar’s Disgraced.  Corporate lawyer Amir Kapoor is happy, in love, and about to land the biggest career promotion of his life.  But beneath the veneer, success has come at a price.  When Amir and his artist wife, Emily, host an intimate dinner party at their Upper East Side apartment, what starts out as a friendly conversation soon escalates into something far more damaging.

Feb
15
Wed
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ University of Wyoming, Arts & Sciences Auditorium
Feb 15 @ 7:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ University of Wyoming, Arts & Sciences Auditorium | Laramie | Wyoming | United States

Tibet and China have had a complex relationship for 1500 years. Wars have been fought, treaties signed, then ignored in the next conquest. But there was always trade. In this presentation, National Geographic writer Mark Jenkins takes us on a journey down the forgotten Tea Horse Road. For almost 1000 years there was a stone-paved road that connected Ya’an, the tea-growing capital of Sichuan province, with Lhasa, the 12,000-foot high capital of Tibet. Tea was essential to daily life in Tibet, and China’s feudal kingdoms needed war horses. For centuries China and Tibet were on equal footing, but the ascendancy of China in the second half of the 20th century has devastated Tibet and Tibetan culture. With National Geographic images, Jenkins reveals the modern lives of the Tibetans, and the Chinese, and the geopolitics that have always connected them.

A critically acclaimed author and internationally recognized journalist, Mark Jenkins covers geopolitics, the environment and adventure for National Geographic. Jenkins’ writing has won numerous awards, including the Overseas Press Club Ross Award for “The Healing Fields” story about landmines in Cambodia and a National Magazine Award for photojournalism with colleague Brint Stirton, for “Who Murdered The Mountain Gorillas” – both of which were the focus of previous World to Wyoming tours around Wyoming. Jenkins is the author of four books and his work has appeared in dozens of national and international magazines.  He has his BA in Philosophy and MS in Geography from the University of Wyoming.

Sponsored by the UW Office of Academic Affairs, Global and Area Studies, Outreach School, the Rocky Mountain Power Foundation, thinkWY | Wyoming Humanities, the Homer and Mildred Scott Foundation, Buffalo Bill Center for the West, National Wildlife Museum and our Wyoming college partners who help us bring the World to Wyoming tour around Wyoming.

Feb
16
Thu
Cultural Gems; A Look at Unique US Libraries with Richard and Mary Maturi @ Hot Springs County Library
Feb 16 @ 6:30 PM – 8:00 PM
Cultural Gems; A Look at Unique US Libraries with Richard and Mary Maturi @ Hot Springs County Library  | Thermopolis | Wyoming | United States

Join Richard and Mary Maturi for Cultural Gems; A Look at Unique US Libraries, featuring  images and stories of libraries from coast to coast.  This presentation  illustrates the rich diversity of America’s libraries while exploring the broad panorama of library architecture, unique building re-purposing and the various ways communities funded their libraries.   The Maturi’s spent a full year traveling the country and learning about libraries; the role they’ve played in community development and identity.  Linda Koldenhoven, Senior Librarian of th Georgia Library for the Blind & Physically Handicapped observed, “An engaging look at America’s unique library architecture and heritage.  A wonderful guide to this county’s cultural history.  What a great idea for your next vacation..tour our nations libraries!”

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