Apr
13
Thu
Read, Rant, Relate: “The Flick” @ Relative Theatrics Studio, Room 278 of the Laramie Plains Civic Center
Apr 13 @ 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Read, Rant, Relate: "The Flick" @ Relative Theatrics Studio, Room 278 of the Laramie Plains Civic Center | Laramie | Wyoming | United States

Experience a new piece of contemporary dramatic literature every month with Relative Theatrics. Participants will engage directly with modern plays by listening to actor-led readings of the texts, then joining discussions breaking down the thematic elements of the works and their relevance to today’s society.

In April, come discuss Annie Baker’s The Flick.  In a run-down movie theater in central Massachusetts, three underpaid employees mop the floors and attend to one of the last 35 millimeter film projectors in the state.  Their tiny battles and not-so-tiny heartbreaks play out in the empty aisles, becoming more gripping than the lackluster, second-run movies on screen.  With keen insight and a finely-tuned comic eye, The Flick is a hilarious and heart-rending cry for authenticity in a fast-changing world.

May
11
Thu
Read, Rant, Relate: “The Humans” @ Relative Theatrics Studio, Room 278 of the Laramie Plains Civic Center
May 11 @ 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Read, Rant, Relate: "The Humans" @ Relative Theatrics Studio, Room 278 of the Laramie Plains Civic Center | Laramie | Wyoming | United States

Experience a new piece of contemporary dramatic literature every month with Relative Theatrics. Participants will engage directly with modern plays by listening to actor-led readings of the texts, then joining discussions breaking down the thematic elements of the works and their relevance to today’s society.

In May, come discuss Stephen Karam’s The Humans.  “…what is so amazing about The Humans (and this is a really amazing new play) is that while Karam’s writing never romanticizes these characters nor minimizes the struggles of those who find themselves lower-middle class and older in years in today’s increasingly elitist and divisive America, he focuses on their connections with each other.  You watch them drive each other crazy, but you also want them at your own dinner, quite badly.  You’ll be surprised how much.  It is hard to think of another play that has dealt with these realities of life as it is lived in ordinary America–that faraway country Broadway so often chooses to ignore in favor of the bourgeoisie problems of one of the Upper Sides–with such compassion.”  -Chris Jones, The Chicago Tribune

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