Feb
25
Sat
Saturday U Sheridan @ Sheridan College, Whitney Academic Center
Feb 25 @ 8:30 AM – 1:45 PM
Saturday U Sheridan @ Sheridan College, Whitney Academic Center | Sheridan | Wyoming | United States

Go back to school for a day, minus the tests, stress and homework.

Each Saturday U term features lectures from three outstanding University of Wyoming professors. Following the lectures, all three professors will participate in a final round-table discussion. Participants may attend one, two, three, or all four sessions. No registration is required, and there is no charge.

8:30 – 8:50 am: Free coffee and pastries

8:50 – 9:00 am: Welcome and opening remarks

9:00 am: “How the Brain Learns to See: Studying Tadpoles to Understand People,Kara Pratt, Assistant Professor of Zoology and Physiology, University of Wyoming

Brains process information through neural networks, but a new brain has contains masses of neurons without connections. How are the proper connections made? The study of Xenopus tadpoles—whose see-through skin lets us view the brain directly—reveals how the brain creates itself by self-assembling neurons into networks that transform external stimuli from the environment into internal perceptions. One key discovery is that visual experience—the act of seeing—actually guides the precise wiring up of the visual system. This talk will describe this exciting research and explain what it reveals about the nature of human sight.

10:00 – 10:10 am: Break

10:15 am: “Democracy’s Past, Democracy’s Future: Problems and Possibilities,Scott Henkel, Assistant Professor of English, University of Wyoming

Now that the fall election has passed, we can take a moment to look more broadly at the history and the future of democracy. Scott Henkel’s lecture will examine how writers and thinkers have understood democracy and have imagined its possibilities. What has democracy been in the United States, in ancient Athens, in cooperative workplaces, even on pirate ships and space ships? Who should participate in the democratic process, and what should that participation be? What might the future of democracy look like?

11:15 – 11:25 am: Break

11:30 am: “Will We Ever Have Beautiful Forests Again? Bark Beetles, Resilience, and Future Forests,Daniel Tinker, Associate Professor of Botany, University of Wyoming

The Intermountain West’s bark beetle epidemic that began in the late 1990s is unprecedented in our recorded history. Its intensity and geographic scale has been overwhelming—and it continues today in many forests of the Western USA. The ramifications for such an intense and prolonged epidemic are far-reaching and many are not well understood, especially considering the changes in our climate happening at the same time. This talk will explore the bark-beetle phenomenon, its ecology and management, and the resilience of current and future forest systems.

12:30 – 1:45 pm: Lunch and question and answer session with presenters

Insight Casper: Identity @ The Lyric Theatre
Feb 25 @ 7:00 PM – 9:15 PM

We’re excited to announce the lineup for our next Insight event, Insight: Identity in Casper on February 25, 2017 at the Lyric Theatre downtown and and in conjunction with the Casper College Humanities Festival.  Insights are mixed-media storytelling events where speakers get 7 minutes and 21 images to tell a story that makes us take a closer look at the human experience.  Insight Casper will feature stories about lost veterans, coal mining, body image, Chinese poets, and much more.  With live music and a cash bar, Insights are fun nights on the town you don’t want to miss. Don’t believe us, ask Cheyenne. Doors open at 6:30, show begins at 7 pm, doors open at 6:15 pm.

Featured presenters include:
Samuel Western is an Economist correspondent and the author of Pushed off the Mountain, Sold Down the River: Wyoming’s Search for its Soul, the poetry collection A Random Census of Souls, and most recently the celebrated novel Canyons. www.samuelwestern.com

Tom Rea is editor and co-founder, with the Wyoming State Historical Society, of WyoHistory.org. He worked for many years in the newspaper business, and his books include Bone Wars: The Excavation and Celebrity of Andrew Carnegie’s Dinosaur (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2001, 2004); Devil’s Gate: Owning the Land, Owning the Story (University of Oklahoma Press, 2006, 2012) and The Hole in the Wall Ranch: A History (Pronghorn Press, 2010).

Susan Stubson began her formal piano studies at age eight. Her first public recital at age eleven began her long and varied career as a performing artist and collaborator. She received a Bachelor of Music Degree in Piano Performance from the University of Colorado, Boulder, during which time she won the hallowed Fiske Competition an unprecedented four consecutive years. Susan received a Masters of Music Degree in Performance and Literature from the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York. Susan believes deeply in public service and celebrating the West’s rich cultural heritage. In 2011, she was appointed by Governor Matt Mead to the Wyoming Cultural Trust Fund where she now serves as Chairman. A strong voice for the arts, she is a frequent contributor to the Writers from Wyoming series as well as a speaker on issues of women in leadership as well as arts advocacy. When she’s not practicing piano, Susan practices law at Crowley, Fleck, PLLP. She is married to Tim Stubson. They have two boys, Huck and Finn, and a cow dog Lillie Roosevelle.

Gail Schenfisch—American Sign Language instructor at Casper College.  She has a BA in Elementary ED from UW and an MS. Ed from Western Oregon University. She works as a sign language interpreter across the state.

Maggie Mullen is a fifth-generation Wyomingite, born and raised in Casper. You might recognize her voice as a reporter and host for Wyoming Public Radio. She enjoys writing, cooking, swimming in rivers and lakes, and most any dog.

Elise Schmelzer is the criminal justice reporter at the Casper Star-Tribune. She’s previously written for The Washington Post, The Dallas Morning News and the Colorado Springs Gazette. When she’s not working, she spends her time riding horses and wandering in the mountains.

Kat Williams — UW MFA candidate– received her BA from the University of Iowa, where she studied German, French, and English Literature. She taught Spanish literacy skills to K-2nd students in Austin, Texas. An animal rights enthusiast, Kat hopes to one day translate her favorite works of literature into language that all cats, dogs, and ferrets can appreciate and understand. She is only mildly ashamed that she makes her dog wear basketball jerseys when her NBA team needs some extra luck. Her story is one of coming to understand body issues and gender fluidity.

Ammon Medina—UW MFA poetry— Ammon Medina was born and raised in Orem, Utah, and is now a candidate of the UW MFA Program. His chapbook Ragged Red Voice was the winner of the 2013 Florence Kahn Memorial Award. He has received a Norman Mailer Fellowship and his work has been published in Warp & Weave and the Provo Orem Word. Ammon’s story deals with masculinity and identity growing up without a father.

George Vlastos is a life long Casper Native, board member of Wyoming Humanities, alumni of the UW MFA program, high school teacher, Wyoming Young Authors coordinator, Neltje Blanchard Fellowship recipient, occasional Cretan villager, and occasionally just a cretin. George’s story wonders what would happen if Han Shan – the 9th century Chinese recluse of Cold Mountain – wandered into Wyoming’s open spaces.

With music by the Dauphin of Mississippi and special guests.

Insight Casper: Identity will be hosted by Wyoming Public Radio & Media’s Cultural Affairs and Production Director, working on shows like the much lauded HumaNature podcast, Micah Schweizer and filmed by University of Wyoming TV. The event is free and open to the public. Insight is a partnership with the University of Wyoming creative writing program-a top 25 program nationally.

 

 

Feb
28
Tue
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Gillette College, Presentation Hall
Feb 28 @ 7:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Gillette College, Presentation Hall | Gillette | Wyoming | United States

Tibet and China have had a complex relationship for 1500 years. Wars have been fought, treaties signed, then ignored in the next conquest. But there was always trade. In this presentation, National Geographic writer Mark Jenkins takes us on a journey down the forgotten Tea Horse Road. For almost 1000 years there was a stone-paved road that connected Ya’an, the tea-growing capital of Sichuan province, with Lhasa, the 12,000-foot high capital of Tibet. Tea was essential to daily life in Tibet, and China’s feudal kingdoms needed war horses. For centuries China and Tibet were on equal footing, but the ascendancy of China in the second half of the 20th century has devastated Tibet and Tibetan culture. With National Geographic images, Jenkins reveals the modern lives of the Tibetans, and the Chinese, and the geopolitics that have always connected them.

A critically acclaimed author and internationally recognized journalist, Mark Jenkins covers geopolitics, the environment and adventure for National Geographic. Jenkins’ writing has won numerous awards, including the Overseas Press Club Ross Award for “The Healing Fields” story about landmines in Cambodia and a National Magazine Award for photojournalism with colleague Brint Stirton, for “Who Murdered The Mountain Gorillas” – both of which were the focus of previous World to Wyoming tours around Wyoming. Jenkins is the author of four books and his work has appeared in dozens of national and international magazines.  He has his BA in Philosophy and MS in Geography from the University of Wyoming.

Sponsored by the UW Office of Academic Affairs, Global and Area Studies, Outreach School, the Rocky Mountain Power Foundation, thinkWY | Wyoming Humanities, the Homer and Mildred Scott Foundation, Buffalo Bill Center for the West, National Wildlife Museum and our Wyoming college partners who help us bring the World to Wyoming tour around Wyoming.

Mar
1
Wed
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Sheridan College, Whitney Concert Hall
Mar 1 @ 7:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Sheridan College, Whitney Concert Hall | Sheridan | Wyoming | United States

Tibet and China have had a complex relationship for 1500 years. Wars have been fought, treaties signed, then ignored in the next conquest. But there was always trade. In this presentation, National Geographic writer Mark Jenkins takes us on a journey down the forgotten Tea Horse Road. For almost 1000 years there was a stone-paved road that connected Ya’an, the tea-growing capital of Sichuan province, with Lhasa, the 12,000-foot high capital of Tibet. Tea was essential to daily life in Tibet, and China’s feudal kingdoms needed war horses. For centuries China and Tibet were on equal footing, but the ascendancy of China in the second half of the 20th century has devastated Tibet and Tibetan culture. With National Geographic images, Jenkins reveals the modern lives of the Tibetans, and the Chinese, and the geopolitics that have always connected them.

A critically acclaimed author and internationally recognized journalist, Mark Jenkins covers geopolitics, the environment and adventure for National Geographic. Jenkins’ writing has won numerous awards, including the Overseas Press Club Ross Award for “The Healing Fields” story about landmines in Cambodia and a National Magazine Award for photojournalism with colleague Brint Stirton, for “Who Murdered The Mountain Gorillas” – both of which were the focus of previous World to Wyoming tours around Wyoming. Jenkins is the author of four books and his work has appeared in dozens of national and international magazines.  He has his BA in Philosophy and MS in Geography from the University of Wyoming.

Sponsored by the UW Office of Academic Affairs, Global and Area Studies, Outreach School, the Rocky Mountain Power Foundation, thinkWY | Wyoming Humanities, the Homer and Mildred Scott Foundation, Buffalo Bill Center for the West, National Wildlife Museum and our Wyoming college partners who help us bring the World to Wyoming tour around Wyoming.

Mar
2
Thu
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Northwest College, Yellowstone Building
Mar 2 @ 6:30 PM – 7:30 PM
Tea, Trade and Tyranny: Tibet and China Over Time @ Northwest College, Yellowstone Building | Powell | Wyoming | United States

Tibet and China have had a complex relationship for 1500 years. Wars have been fought, treaties signed, then ignored in the next conquest. But there was always trade. In this presentation, National Geographic writer Mark Jenkins takes us on a journey down the forgotten Tea Horse Road. For almost 1000 years there was a stone-paved road that connected Ya’an, the tea-growing capital of Sichuan province, with Lhasa, the 12,000-foot high capital of Tibet. Tea was essential to daily life in Tibet, and China’s feudal kingdoms needed war horses. For centuries China and Tibet were on equal footing, but the ascendancy of China in the second half of the 20th century has devastated Tibet and Tibetan culture. With National Geographic images, Jenkins reveals the modern lives of the Tibetans, and the Chinese, and the geopolitics that have always connected them.

A critically acclaimed author and internationally recognized journalist, Mark Jenkins covers geopolitics, the environment and adventure for National Geographic. Jenkins’ writing has won numerous awards, including the Overseas Press Club Ross Award for “The Healing Fields” story about landmines in Cambodia and a National Magazine Award for photojournalism with colleague Brint Stirton, for “Who Murdered The Mountain Gorillas” – both of which were the focus of previous World to Wyoming tours around Wyoming. Jenkins is the author of four books and his work has appeared in dozens of national and international magazines.  He has his BA in Philosophy and MS in Geography from the University of Wyoming.

Sponsored by the UW Office of Academic Affairs, Global and Area Studies, Outreach School, the Rocky Mountain Power Foundation, thinkWY | Wyoming Humanities, the Homer and Mildred Scott Foundation, Buffalo Bill Center for the West, National Wildlife Museum and our Wyoming college partners who help us bring the World to Wyoming tour around Wyoming.

Mar
3
Fri
World Languages Day: Planetarium Shows @ University of Wyoming campus
Mar 3 @ 6:30 PM – 9:00 PM
World Languages Day: Planetarium Shows @ University of Wyoming campus

World Languages Day (WLD) introduces Wyoming foreign language students to the University of Wyoming campus, exposes them to experts from around the world, and leaves a lasting impression of friendship and global understanding. Last year, UW hosted 240 students and instructors from across the state. Languages represented include Spanish, German, French, Chinese, Japanese, English as a Second Language and American Sign Language.

Mar
4
Sat
Saturday U Jackson @ National Museum of Wildlife Art
Mar 4 @ 8:30 AM – 12:30 PM
Saturday U Jackson @ National Museum of Wildlife Art | Jackson | Wyoming | United States

Go back to school for a day, minus the tests, stress and homework.

Each Saturday U term features lectures from three outstanding University of Wyoming professors. Following the lectures, all three professors will participate in a final roundtable discussion. Participants may attend one, two, three, or all four sessions. No registration is required, and there is no charge.

8:30 – 8:50 am: Free coffee and pastries

8:50 – 9:00 am: Welcome and opening remarks

9:00 – 10:00 am: “An Economy that Works: Measuring Immigrant Contributions to Teton County,Noah Novogrodsky, Professor of Law, University of Wyoming

Professor Noah Novogrodsky leads a team of law students conducting an economic impact study of the contributions immigrants make to Teton County. The study measures the business impact of immigrant workers, from employees in tourism and hospitality to small-business owners and investors to foreign students who are authorized to work.  Professor Novogrodsky’s discussion of the study reveals how complex immigration debates are, the unique political alliances that surround the subject and what is likely to happen or not happen on immigration matters under a Trump Administration.

10:15 – 11:15 am: “Writing the New American West: Positron Literature,Nina S. McConigley, Assistant Professor of Honors, University of Wyoming

Writing about the American West has moved well beyond literature featuring the American Old West or Frontier narratives typically set in the century spanning the late eighteenth and the late nineteenth century. In its place, a new understanding of contemporary western writing is emerging. Sometimes referred to as Positron literature, the more recent literary output of the region tends to engage in a reinterpretation of the region, calling into question the ways in which it has been defined in the past.

11:30 am – 12:30 pm: “The Biology of Sex, Gender, and Orientation,Donal Skinner, Professor and Department Chair of Zoology and Physiology, University of Wyoming

From a biological perspective, sexual development and differentiation does not neatly align with societal expectations. During the gestation process, exposure to a variety of hormones “programs” numerous sex organs—the genitalia, the brain and even the heart—to behave in different ways. Recent research elucidates some of the mechanisms guiding this programming and the rich mosaic of potential outcomes they can produce.

World Languages Day: Workshops @ University of Wyoming campus
Mar 4 @ 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM
World Languages Day: Workshops @ University of Wyoming campus

World Languages Day (WLD) introduces Wyoming foreign language students to the University of Wyoming campus, exposes them to experts from around the world, and leaves a lasting impression of friendship and global understanding. Last year, UW hosted 240 students and instructors from across the state. Languages represented include Spanish, German, French, Chinese, Japanese, English as a Second Language and American Sign Language.

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