Oct
28
Sat
Saturday University Cody @ Buffalo Bill Center of the West
Oct 28 @ 8:30 AM – 12:30 PM
Saturday University Cody @ Buffalo Bill Center of the West | Cody | Wyoming | United States

Go back to school for a day, minus the tests, stress and homework.

Each Saturday U term features lectures from three outstanding University of Wyoming professors. Following the lectures, all three professors will participate in a final round-table discussion. Participants may attend one, two, three, or all four sessions. No registration is required, and there is no charge.

8:30 am: Doors open for coffee and donuts

9:00 am: “How Did Shoshone Cavern National Monument Become Just Another Hole in the Ground?: A Case Study in State/Federal Debates over Control of Public Lands,” Dr. Phil Roberts, Professor of History

Shoshone Cavern National Monument, five miles from downtown Cody, became Wyoming’s second national monument soon after it was discovered by Ned Frost and his dog in the early 20th century.  The cavern mouth’s location unfortunately made access difficult, even with horses. Development as a tourist site never overcame this problem. After years of conflict between the Park Service and Cody residents, Congress delisted the monument and transferred it to the City of Cody. The result could have been a model for the success of local control over former federally-owned lands. Instead, the story forms a cautionary tale of how local towns often are unable to manage public lands any better than the federal government—and these failures often result in damage of the resource.

10:15 am: “How the Brain Learns to See: Studying Tadpoles to Understand People,” Dr. Kara Pratt, Assistant Professor of Zoology and Physiology

Brains process information through neural networks, but a new brain has contains masses of neurons without connections. How are the proper connections made? The study of Xenopus tadpoles—whose see-through skin lets us view the brain directly—reveals how the brain creates itself by self-assembling neurons into networks that transform external stimuli from the environment into internal perceptions. One key discovery is that visual experience—the act of seeing—actually guides the precise wiring up of the visual system. This talk will describe this exciting research and explain what it reveals about the nature of human sight.

11:30 am: “Will We Ever Have Beautiful Forests Again? Bark Beetles, Resilience, and Future Forests,” Daniel Tinker, Associate Professor of Botany, University of Wyoming

The Intermountain West’s bark beetle epidemic that began in the late 1990s is unprecedented in our recorded history. Its intensity and geographic scale has been overwhelming—and it continues today in many forests of the Western USA. The ramifications for such an intense and prolonged epidemic are far-reaching and many are not well understood, especially considering the changes in our climate happening at the same time. This talk will explore the bark-beetle phenomenon, its ecology and management, and the resilience of current and future forest systems.

Nov
2
Thu
Saturday University Gillette @ Campbell County Public Library
Nov 2 @ 5:30 PM – 8:30 PM
Saturday University Gillette @ Campbell County Public Library

Go back to school for a day, minus the tests, stress and homework.

Each Saturday U term features lectures from three outstanding University of Wyoming professors. Following the lectures, all three professors will participate in a final round-table discussion. Participants may attend one, two, three, or all four sessions. No registration is required, and there is no charge.

5:30 pm: Door open.  Free, light dinner and snacks.

6:00 pm: “Tropical forests in Wyoming? Only 55 Million Years Ago,” Dr. Ellen Currano, Associate Professor of Botany, Geology and Geophysics, University of Wyoming

Wyoming fossils are world famous, particularly those from the Paleocene and Eocene periods (66-34 million years ago). Using our trusty picks and shovels, we can travel back in time over 50 million years, to a Wyoming resembling modern-day Florida, covered in palm trees and populated by alligators. This talk will describe Wyoming’s fossil plants from this last great warm interval and discuss how they can be used to reconstruct past climates and landscapes.

7:15 pm: “Bigger Than We Can Imagine: How Mathematicians Grapple with Infinity,” Dr. Myron Allen, Professor of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Wyoming

From the time of the ancient Greeks, people have wondered about the infinite. During the past two centuries, in resolving classical paradoxes involving infinity, mathematicians have discovered many surprising and seemingly paradoxical facts about infinite sets. This presentation reviews this history and some of the fascinating logic behind one of humankind’s most challenging concepts.

8:30 pm: “Finding Religion in a Globalized World,” Dr. Mary Keller, Senior Lecturer of Philosophy and Religious Studies, University of Wyoming

Since many of the world’s human cultures lack a word for “religion,” does that mean they are not religious? Or is there a religious nature in humanity that needs no explicit name? Join me as we study actions and cultural attitudes from the Crow Indian nation, the Caribbean Republic of Benin and the United States and learn how to evaluate their implicit and explicit religious nature.

Nov
17
Fri
Storyteller Peter Aguero – “Daddy Issues” @ Black Box, Center for the Arts
Nov 17 @ 7:00 PM – 8:45 PM
Storyteller Peter Aguero - "Daddy Issues" @ Black Box, Center for the Arts

Peter Aguero, storyteller extraordinaire, will perform Daddy Issues and present a storytelling workshop in November. These are definitely geared toward adults.  When Peter acted as the host for The Moth’s appearance at The Center in 2016, the event sold out.

There will be a short Q&A with Peter immediately following the performance. This will be moderated by Cassandra Lee,  podscaster for KHOL 89.1 Community Radio Station. A native of Wyoming, Cassandra graduated with honors from the University of Colorado at Boulder. As does everybody in Jackson, she wears many hats: yoga instructor, academic tutor, and a story-teller in her own right.

Peter Aguero is an award-winning story-teller, who teaches workshops at universities around the country, hosts The Moth radio hour on National Public Radio, has worked with community story-telling programs for the under-served in NYC, and tells his own stories around North America to packed audiences. He is a Moth GrandSLAM champion. Although he has no academic degree, his prowess as a story-teller places him at the forefront of his craft. Born in New Jersey in 1976, he currently lives in Brooklyn where he sings in a rock band. He is married.

Nov
18
Sat
Storyteller Peter Aguero – Workshop @ Black Box, Center for the Arts
Nov 18 @ 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Storyteller Peter Aguero - Workshop @ Black Box, Center for the Arts

Peter Aguero, storyteller extraordinaire, will lead a three-hour storytelling workshop for adults and mature teens.  The goal of the project is to provide an opportunity for writers an oral-storytellers to learn from each other, to craft better stories, whether on the page or as spoken words.  Through the art and craft of story-telling, people remember what each has in common with the entire community, how each of us experiences love and hate, joy and sadness, no matter our past or present.

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