Upcoming events
across Wyoming

thinkWY | Wyoming Humanities supports programs, events, speakers, gatherings, exhibits and more in communities across Wyoming.
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Feb
22
Thu
“The Trial of Tom Horn” @ Western Wyoming College
Feb 22 @ 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
"The Trial of Tom Horn" @ Western Wyoming College

John W. Davis, a trial lawyer from Worland, Wyoming will be showcasing his new book The Trial of Tom Horn, published with the University of Oklahoma Press in 2016. Mr. Davis has had a long and distinguished career as an attorney in the state of Wyoming. Late in his career, however, he decided to transition to writing on the subject of Wyoming’s legal history. In this presentation, he will highlight how the trial and conviction of Tom Horn marked a major milestone in the hard-fought battle against vigilantism in the state of Wyoming, and will illuminate the larger narrative of conflict between the power of wealth and the forces of law and order in the American West.

This presentation will be lecture style, followed by a question and answer period.  Mr. Davis will be presenting on his research, and will discuss, of course, the myths and legends surrounding this historic figure.

Feb
27
Tue
“Camels, Climbing and St. Catherine: An Expedition to Egypt with National Geographic’s Mark Jenkins” (Laramie) @ UW Arts & Sciences Auditorium
Feb 27 @ 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
"Camels, Climbing and St. Catherine: An Expedition to Egypt with National Geographic's Mark Jenkins" (Laramie) @ UW Arts & Sciences Auditorium

Hidden in the heart of the desert mountains of the Sinai peninsula are enormous walls and domes of red granite. It’s an unknown little Yosemite on the edge of the Middle East. In November, National Geographic writer and Center for Global Studies Senior Fellow Mark Jenkins Mark Jenkins led a 4-man team of Wyoming climbers to South Sinai in search of unclimbed rock. The team lived with the Bedouins, traveled by camel caravan and put up new routes on 1000-foot walls of shining granite.

South Sinai is a pivotal region in the three Abrahamic religions: Christianity, Judaism and Islam. It was on Mount Sinai that Moses is said to have received the Ten Commandments. The team hiked the 3000 “Steps of Repentance” to the summit of Mt. Sinai along with dozens of pilgrims, Muslims, Christians, and Jews. At the base of Mt. Sinai lies Saint Catherine’s Monastery, built in 565 A.D. upon the site where Moses saw the burning bush. Named after Catherine of Alexandria who was sentenced to death on the spiked wheel, St. Catherine’s is the oldest continuously operating monastery in the word. Christians and Muslims have lived here in harmony for over a millennium–there’s even a mosque inside the monastery.

“Camels, Climbing and St. Catherine: A Expedition to Egypt,” is a presentation about an epic expedition to climb big walls in a remote land, about Christian monks and Bedouin nomads, about a place where tolerance is more powerful than terrorism.

Mar
1
Thu
Reading Wyoming Jackson: “The Namesake” @ Jackson Whole Grocer Community Room
Mar 1 @ 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Reading Wyoming Jackson: "The Namesake" @ Jackson Whole Grocer Community Room

Come discuss books that examine the topic of immigration and displacement, moderated by local scholar Stephen Lottridge.

March’s discussion is focused on Jhumpa Lahiri’s The Namesake.  “Moving between events in Calcutta, Boston, and New York City, the novel examines the nuances involved with being caught between two conflicting cultures with highly distinct religious, social, and ideological differences.”

Mar
6
Tue
“Camels, Climbing and St. Catherine: An Expedition to Egypt with National Geographic’s Mark Jenkins” (Sheridan) @ Whitney Center for the Arts Concert Hall, Sheridan College
Mar 6 @ 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
"Camels, Climbing and St. Catherine: An Expedition to Egypt with National Geographic's Mark Jenkins" (Sheridan) @ Whitney Center for the Arts Concert Hall, Sheridan College

Hidden in the heart of the desert mountains of the Sinai peninsula are enormous walls and domes of red granite. It’s an unknown little Yosemite on the edge of the Middle East. In November, National Geographic writer and Center for Global Studies Senior Fellow Mark Jenkins Mark Jenkins led a 4-man team of Wyoming climbers to South Sinai in search of unclimbed rock. The team lived with the Bedouins, traveled by camel caravan and put up new routes on 1000-foot walls of shining granite.

South Sinai is a pivotal region in the three Abrahamic religions: Christianity, Judaism and Islam. It was on Mount Sinai that Moses is said to have received the Ten Commandments. The team hiked the 3000 “Steps of Repentance” to the summit of Mt. Sinai along with dozens of pilgrims, Muslims, Christians, and Jews. At the base of Mt. Sinai lies Saint Catherine’s Monastery, built in 565 A.D. upon the site where Moses saw the burning bush. Named after Catherine of Alexandria who was sentenced to death on the spiked wheel, St. Catherine’s is the oldest continuously operating monastery in the world. Christians and Muslims have lived here in harmony for over a millennium–there’s even a mosque inside the monastery.

“Camels, Climbing and St. Catherine: A Expedition to Egypt,” is a presentation about an epic expedition to climb big walls in a remote land, about Christian monks and Bedouin nomads, about a place where tolerance is more powerful than terrorism.

Mar
7
Wed
“Deep Mapping” Writing Workshop with Kali Fajardo-Anstine @ Center for the Arts, Conference Room
Mar 7 @ 6:00 PM – 8:30 PM
"Deep Mapping" Writing Workshop with Kali Fajardo-Anstine @ Center for the Arts, Conference Room

Join award-winning writer and teacher Kali Fajardo-Anstine for a writing workshop.  Participants will read a short story by Latina author Sandra Cisneros (copies provided in advance) and then discuss the themes and their impacts on communities and individuals.  The discussion will move into generative writing, based loosely on William Least Heat Moon’s Blue Highway as a model for “deep mapping” of a story, whether fictional or not.  This workshop is geared toward high school age students and adults writing in English.

“Camels, Climbing and St. Catherine: An Expedition to Egypt with National Geographic’s Mark Jenkins” (Gillette) @ Gillette College Presentation Hall
Mar 7 @ 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
"Camels, Climbing and St. Catherine: An Expedition to Egypt with National Geographic's Mark Jenkins" (Gillette) @ Gillette College Presentation Hall

Hidden in the heart of the desert mountains of the Sinai peninsula are enormous walls and domes of red granite. It’s an unknown little Yosemite on the edge of the Middle East. In November, National Geographic writer and Center for Global Studies Senior Fellow Mark Jenkins Mark Jenkins led a 4-man team of Wyoming climbers to South Sinai in search of unclimbed rock. The team lived with the Bedouins, traveled by camel caravan and put up new routes on 1000-foot walls of shining granite.

South Sinai is a pivotal region in the three Abrahamic religions: Christianity, Judaism and Islam. It was on Mount Sinai that Moses is said to have received the Ten Commandments. The team hiked the 3000 “Steps of Repentance” to the summit of Mt. Sinai along with dozens of pilgrims, Muslims, Christians, and Jews. At the base of Mt. Sinai lies Saint Catherine’s Monastery, built in 565 A.D. upon the site where Moses saw the burning bush. Named after Catherine of Alexandria who was sentenced to death on the spiked wheel, St. Catherine’s is the oldest continuously operating monastery in the world. Christians and Muslims have lived here in harmony for over a millennium–there’s even a mosque inside the monastery.

“Camels, Climbing and St. Catherine: A Expedition to Egypt,” is a presentation about an epic expedition to climb big walls in a remote land, about Christian monks and Bedouin nomads, about a place where tolerance is more powerful than terrorism.

Mar
8
Thu
Kali Fajardo-Anstine Reading @ Teton County Library, Ordway Auditorium
Mar 8 @ 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Kali Fajardo-Anstine Reading @ Teton County Library, Ordway Auditorium

Join award-winning writer and teacher Kali Fajardo-Anstine for a reading of her work, followed by a Q&A and free soup.

“Deep Mapping” Workshop for Parents and Children @ Teton Literacy Center, meeting area
Mar 8 @ 5:30 PM – 7:30 PM
"Deep Mapping" Workshop for Parents and Children @ Teton Literacy Center, meeting area

High school age students and their parents are invited to join award-winning writer and teacher Kali Fajardo-Anstine for a generative writing session.  Participants will be asked to examine a traditional Mexican folk tale.  The workshop will then open up for participants to share stories of their own culture.  The workshop is focused on the collection of these stories and a conversation between generations about the stories.  A translator will be available as needed.

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